Pathology & Oncology Research

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 803–808 | Cite as

Characterization of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Integration Sites into Genital Cancers

  • Clorinda Annunziata
  • Luigi Buonaguro
  • Franco M. Buonaguro
  • Maria Lina Tornesello
Research

Abstract

Oncogenic HPVs have been found frequently integrated into human genome of invasive cancers and chromosomal localization has been extensively investigated in cervical carcinoma. Few studies have analyzed the HPV integration loci in other genital cancers. We have characterized the integration sites of HPV16 in invasive penile carcinoma by means of Alu-HPV-based PCR. Nucleotide sequence analysis of viral–human DNA junctions showed that HPV integration occurred in one case within the chromosome 8q21.3 region, in which the FAM92A1 gene is mapped, and in the second case inside the chromosome 16p13.3, within the intronic region of TRAP1 gene. These results confirm previous observations, summarized in a systematic review of the literature, on the HPV integration events in gene loci relevant to cancer pathogenesis.

Keywords

Human Papillomavirus HPV Integration sites Penile cancer Vulvar Cancer 

Abbreviations

HPV

Human Papillomavirus

PC

Penile Cancer

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Copyright information

© Arányi Lajos Foundation 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clorinda Annunziata
    • 1
  • Luigi Buonaguro
    • 1
  • Franco M. Buonaguro
    • 1
  • Maria Lina Tornesello
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Biology and Viral Oncology and AIDS Reference CentreNational Cancer Institute “Fondazione Pascale”NaplesItaly

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