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Virologica Sinica

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 159–162 | Cite as

A novel mosquito-borne reassortant orbivirus isolated from Xishuangbanna, China

  • Shaozhen Xing
  • Xiaofang Guo
  • Xianglilan Zhang
  • Qiumin Zhao
  • Lingli Li
  • Shuqing Zuo
  • Xiaoping An
  • Guangqian Pei
  • Qiang Sun
  • Shi Cheng
  • Yunfei Wang
  • Hang Fan
  • Zhiqiang Mi
  • Yong Huang
  • Zhiyi Zhang
  • Hongning ZhouEmail author
  • Jiusong ZhangEmail author
  • Yigang TongEmail author
Letter

Dear Editor,

The genus Orbivirus, within the family Reoviridae, includes 22 virus species (King et al., 2011). They are distributed globally, but are particularly prevalent in Europe, Asia, and Africa. In addition, they can be transmitted by ticks or other hematophagous insect vectors, including Culicoides, mosquitoes, and sandflies (Belaganahalli et al., 2015).

Orbiviruses contain double-stranded RNA as their genetic material, which includes 10 segments (S1–S10) of various lengths. Owing to this segmented structure, genetic reassortment occurs frequently among orbiviruses. Reassortment occurs when different segmented viruses of the same vector type infect a single host cell, and genomic segments of the “parental” viruses are exchanged and repackaged during progeny formation (Simon-loriere and Holmes, 2011). Reassortment can result in novel viral genotypes and subsequent phenotypes, which can alter the mechanism of immune escape, the potential range of hosts or vectors, and the...

Supplementary material

12250_2016_3886_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.4 mb)
A novel mosquito-borne reassortant orbivirus isolated from Xishuangbanna, China

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Copyright information

© Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS and Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shaozhen Xing
    • 1
    • 3
  • Xiaofang Guo
    • 2
  • Xianglilan Zhang
    • 1
  • Qiumin Zhao
    • 1
  • Lingli Li
    • 1
  • Shuqing Zuo
    • 1
  • Xiaoping An
    • 1
  • Guangqian Pei
    • 1
  • Qiang Sun
    • 1
  • Shi Cheng
    • 1
  • Yunfei Wang
    • 1
  • Hang Fan
    • 1
  • Zhiqiang Mi
    • 1
  • Yong Huang
    • 1
  • Zhiyi Zhang
    • 1
  • Hongning Zhou
    • 2
    Email author
  • Jiusong Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yigang Tong
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and BiosecurityBeijing Institute of Microbiology and EpidemiologyBeijingChina
  2. 2.Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory of Vector-borne Diseases Control and ResearchYunnan Institute of Parasitic DiseasesPu’erChina
  3. 3.Hebei Normal University, College of ScienceShijiazhuangChina

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