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International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 923–932 | Cite as

Yaw Stability Control of 4WD Vehicles Based on Model Predictive Torque Vectoring with Physical Constraints

  • Kwangseok OhEmail author
  • Eunhyek Joa
  • Jisoo Lee
  • Jaemin Yun
  • Kyongsu Yi
Article
  • 11 Downloads

Abstract

This paper describes a yaw stability control algorithm of 4WD vehicles based on model predictive torque vectoring with physical constraints. A vehicle planar model based predictive rear and all-wheel torque vectoring algorithms were developed for 4WD vehicles by considering predictive states and driver’s steering wheel angle. The physical constraints applied to the model predictive control consist of three types: limitation on magnitude of tire force, change rate of tire force, and output torque of transfer case. Two types of torque vectoring algorithms, rear-wheel and all-wheel, were constructed for comparative analysis. The steady state yaw rate was derived and applied as a desired value for yaw stability of the vehicle. The algorithm was constructed in a MATLAB/Simulink environment and the performance evaluation was conducted under various test scenarios, such as step steering and double lane change, using the CarSim software. The evaluation results of the predictive torque vectoring showed sound performance based on the prediction of states and driver’s steering angle.

Key words

Model predictive control Torque vectoring Physical constraint Torque distribution Yaw stability 

Nomenclature

Nomenclature

\(\dot\psi\)

yaw rate, rad/s

m

vehicle mass, kg

lf

distance between mass center and front axle, m

lr

distance between mass center and rear axle, m

C

cornering stiffness, N/rad

δ

steering angle, rad

υ

velocity, m/s

tw

vehicle width, m

F

tire force, N

I

moment of inertia, kg m2

N

prediction step

rw

wheel radius, m

e

error state

u

input

w

disturbance

ω

wheel speed, rad/s

Subscripts

x, y, z

longitudinal, lateral, and vertical

fl, fr, rl, rr

front-left, front-right, rear-left, and rear-right

ss

steady-state

des

desired

d

discretized

eq, in

equality, inequality

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Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by a research grant from Hyundai Motor Group “Future Technology Research in the year of 2017”.

References

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Copyright information

© KSAE 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kwangseok Oh
    • 1
    Email author
  • Eunhyek Joa
    • 2
  • Jisoo Lee
    • 3
  • Jaemin Yun
    • 3
  • Kyongsu Yi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringHankyong National UniversityGyeonggiKorea
  2. 2.School of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea
  3. 3.Chassis System Control Development TeamHyundai Motor CompanyHwaseong-si, GyeonggiKorea

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