Advertisement

International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 19, Issue 5, pp 759–769 | Cite as

Effects of Residual Ash on Dpf Capture and Regeneration

  • Yingxin Cui
  • Yixi Cai
  • Runlin Fan
  • Yunxi Shi
  • Linbo Gu
  • Xiaoyu Pu
  • Jing Tian
Article
  • 88 Downloads

Abstract

To study the effects of residual ash on the capture and regeneration of a diesel particulate filter (DPF), repeated capture and complete regeneration experiments were conducted. An engine exhaust particulate sizer was used to measure the particle size distribution of diesel in the front and back of DPF. Discrepancies in the size distribution of the particulate matter in repeated trapping tests were analyzed. To achieve complete DPF regeneration, a DPF regeneration system using nonthermal plasma technology was established. The regeneration carbon removal mass and peak temperatures of DPF internal measuring points were monitored to evaluate the effect of regeneration. The mechanism explaining the influence of residual ash on DPF capture and regeneration was thoroughly investigated. Results indicate that the DPF trapping efficiencies of the nuclear-mode particles and ultrafine particles have significant improvements with the increase quantity of residual ash, from 90 % and 96.01 % to 94.17 % and 97.27 %, respectively. The exhaust backpressure of the DPF rises from 9.41 kPa to 11.24 kPa. Heat transfer in the DPF is improved with ash, and the peak temperatures of the measuring points accordingly increase. By comparing the regeneration trials, the elapsed time for complete regeneration and time difference for reaching the peak temperature between adjacent reaction interfaces are extended with increased quantity of ash. The carbon removal mass rises by 34.00 %.

Key words

Diesel engine Diesel particulate filter Particulate matter Regeneration Ash Non-thermal plasma 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beatrice, C., Iorio, S. D., Guido, C. and Napolitano, P. (2012). Detailed characterization of particulate emissions of an automotive catalyzed DPF using actual regeneration strategies. Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science 39, 5, 45–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Burtscher, H. (2005). Physical characterization of particulate emissions from diesel engines: A review. J. Aerosol Science 36, 7, 896–932.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chen, P. and Wang, J. (2014). Air-fraction modeling during active DPF regenerations. Applied Energy, 122, 310–320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chen, T., Wu, Z., Gong, J. and E, J. Q. (2016). Numerical simulation of diesel particulate filter regeneration considering ash deposit. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 97, 3, 849–864.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Daggolu, P. R., Gogia, D. K. and Siddiquie, T. A. (2017). Exhaust after treatment system for diesel locomotive engines–A review. Locomotives and Rail Road Transportation, 2017, 155–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fang, J., Meng, Z., Li, J., Pu, Y., Du, Y. and Li, J. (2017). The influence of ash on soot deposition and regeneration processes in diesel particular filter. Applied Thermal Engineering, 124, 633–640.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Fino, D. and Specchia, V. (2008). Open issues in oxidative catalysis for diesel particulate abatement. Powder Technology 180, 1–2, 64–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gu, L., Cai, Y., Shi, Y., Wang, J., Xiaoyu, P., Xu, H. and Cui, Y. (2017). Experimental study on purification of diesel particulate matter by non-thermal plasma technology. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing 37, 4, 1193–1209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Ishizawa, T., Yamane, H., Satoh, H., Sekiguchi, K., Arai, M. and Yoshimoto, N. (2010). Investigation into ash loading and its relationship to DPF regeneration method. SAE Int. J. Commercial Vehicles 2, 2, 164–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Jang, J., Lee, Y. and Kwon, O. (2017). Comparison of fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions between the aged and new DPF systems of Euro 5 diesel passenger car. Int. J. Automotive Technology 18, 5, 751–758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Kang, J., Chu, S., Lee, J., Kim, G. and Min, K. (2018). Effect of operating parameters on diesel/propane dual fuel premixed compression ignition in a diesel engine. Int. J. Automotive Technology 19, 1, 27–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Khan, M. Y., Johnson, K. C., Durbin, T. D., Jung, H., Iii, D. R. C. and Bishnu, D. (2012). Characterization of PMPEMS for in-use measurements conducted during validation testing for the PM-PEMS measurement allowance program. Atmospheric Environment 55, 3, 311–318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kuwahara, T., Nakaguchi, H., Kuroki, T. and Okubo, M. (2016). Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NOx in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma. J. Hazardous Materials, 308, 216–224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Kuwahara, T., Nishii, S., Kuroki, T. and Okubo, M. (2013). Complete regeneration characteristics of diesel particulate filter using ozone injection. Applied Energy, 111, 652–656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Lee, S. and Kim, T. Y. (2017). Performance and emission characteristics of a DIdiesel engine operated with diesel/ DEE blended fuel. Applied Thermal Engineering, 121, 454–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Liati, A., Eggenschwiler, D., Gubler, M., Schreiber, D. and Aguirre, M. (2012). Investigation of diesel ash particulate matter: A scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope study. Atmospheric Environment, 49, 391–402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Littera, D. (2014). Investigation of PMFormation and Evolution in Plumes Emitted by Heavy-duty Diesel Vehicles: Wind Tunnel Study. M. S. Thesis. West Virginia University. Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.Google Scholar
  18. Manni, M., Pedicillo, A. and Bazzano, F. (2006). A study of lubricating oil impact on diesel particulate filters by means of accelerated engine tests. Powertrain & Fluid Systems Conf. and Exhibition, 2006, 1, 3416.Google Scholar
  19. Mokhri, M. A., Abdullah, N. R., Abdullah, S. A., Kasalong, S. and Mamat, R. (2012). Soot filtration recent simulation analysis in diesel particulate filter (DPF). Procedia Engineering, 41, 1750–1755.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Nour, M., Kosaka, H., Abdel-Rahman, A. K. and Bady, M. (2016). Effect of water injection into exhaust manifold on diesel engine combustion and emissions. Energy Procedia, 100, 178–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Okubo, M., Kuwahara, T., Yoshida, K., Kannaka, Y. and Kuroki, T. (2010). Improvement of NOx reduction efficiency in diesel emission using nonthermal plasmaexhaust gas recirculation combined aftertreatment. Industry Applications Society Annual Meeting, Houston, Texas, USA.Google Scholar
  22. Palma, V., Ciambelli, P., Meloni, E. and Sin, A. (2015). Catalytic DPF microwave assisted active regeneration. Fuel, 140, 50–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Pu, X., Cai, Y., Shi, Y., Wang, J., Gu, L., Tian, J. and Li, W. (2017). Diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration using non-thermal plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge. J. Energy Institute 6, 4, 1–13.Google Scholar
  24. Sappok, A. and Wong, V. W. (2009). Lubricant-derived ash properties and their Effects on diesel particulate filter pressure drop performance. ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division Fall Technical Conf., Lucerne, Switzerland, 327–343.Google Scholar
  25. Senda, J. and Kitamura, T. (2013). Diesel combustion: PM formation mechanism. Open J. Microphysics 3, 2162–2450, 43–46.Google Scholar
  26. Shi, Y., Cai, Y., Li, X., Xu, H., Li, W. and Pu, X. (2016). Low temperature diesel particulate filter regeneration by atmospheric air non-thermal plasma injection system. Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing 36, 3, 783–797.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Squaiella, L. L. F., Martins, C. A. and Lacava, P. T. (2013). Strategies for emission control in diesel engine to meet euro VI. Fuel, 104, 183–193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Tan, Y. H., Abdullah, M. O., Nolasco-Hipolito, C., Zauzi, N. S. A. and Abdullah, G. W. (2017). Engine performance and emissions characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel-bioethanol emulsions. Energy Conversion and Management, 132, 54–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Wang, X., Cheung, C. S., Di, Y. and Huang, Z. (2012). Diesel engine gaseous and particle emissions fueled with diesel–oxygenate blends. Fuel, 94, 317–323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Xu, B. Y., Liu, X. L., Jiang, L. L. and Xu, J. (2017). Simulation of mixed gas formation for a spray-wall complex guided LPG direct injection engine. Int. J. Automotive Technology 18, 3, 489–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Yamamoto, K., Oohori, S., Yamashita, H. and Daido, S. (2009). Simulation on soot deposition and combustion in diesel particulate filter. Proc. Combustion Institute 32, 2, 1965–1972.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Yoshida, K., Kuroki, T. and Okubo, M. (2009). Diesel emission control system using combined process of nonthermal plasma and exhaust gas components recirculation. Thin Solid Films 518, 3, 987–992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Yu, H., Liang, X. and Shu, G. (2017). Numerical study of the early injection parameters on wall wetting characteristics of an HCCI diesel engine using early injection strategy. Int. J. Automotive Technology 18, 5, 759–768.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Zhao, H. and Wang, W. (2010). After-treatment Technology for Vehicle Diesel. 1st edn. Science and Technology of China Press. Beijing, China.Google Scholar
  35. Zheng, X., Wu, Y., Zhang, S., Baldauf, R. W., Zhang, K. M. and Hu, J. (2016). Joint measurements of black carbon and particle mass for heavy-duty diesel vehicles using a portable emission measurement system. Atmospheric Environment, 141, 435–442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yingxin Cui
    • 1
  • Yixi Cai
    • 1
  • Runlin Fan
    • 1
  • Yunxi Shi
    • 1
  • Linbo Gu
    • 1
  • Xiaoyu Pu
    • 1
  • Jing Tian
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Automotive and Traffic EngineeringJiangsu UniversityJiangsuChina

Personalised recommendations