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Mean Value WGT Diesel Engine Calibration Model for Effective Simulation Research

  • Jae Woo Chung
  • Nam Ho Kim
  • Deok Jin Kim
  • Seong Sik Jang
Article
  • 82 Downloads

Abstract

Recently, to improve vehicle fuel economy, as well as the performance of internal combustion engines, optimized system matching between a vehicle’s drivetrain and engine has become a very important technical issue. For this reason, the need for simulation research on engine and vehicle performance improvement has increased. But in general, since both engine simulation and vehicle simulation require initial engine calibration map input, a simple engine calibration method is required for the efficient configuration of various virtual engine calibration map setups. On this background, in this study, an example of waste gate turbocharger (WGT) cooled — exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) Diesel engine calibration using a test-based mean value engine model is presented as a suitable engine calibration map setting method. Also, the feasibility of an engine calibration model is confirmed through various engine tests. Using the simple model presented here, it is possible for diverse engine operating conditions and engine performance maps to be acquired.

Key Words

Waste Gate Turbocharger (WGT) Diesel engine Engine calibration Mean value model Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Fuel consumption 

Nomenclature

a, b, c, d|experimental constants

AF(λ)

air-fuel ratio

Cp

specific heat ratio

cp

mean piston speed

D

blade diameter

Dp

differential pressure

EGR

EGR rate

FMEP

friction mean effective pressure

H

head

k

coefficients

mass flow rate

M

compressor inlet Mach number

N

rotational speed

PMEP

pumping mean effective pressure

p

pressure

heat

energy of gas

Qs

corrected air flow rate

R

gas constant

stroke

engine stroke

T

temperature

U

blade tip speed

γ

specific heat ratio

η

efficiency

ρ

air density

ϕ

non-dimensional flow rate

ψ

dimensionless head parameter

Subscripts

air

inlet air

c

compressor

cool

cooling

coolant

coolant

cooler inlet

cooler inlet gas

cooler outlet

cooler outlet gas

egr

exhaust gas recirculation

exmani

exhaust manifold

i

indicated

inmani

intake manifold

max

maximum

p

polytropic

r

ratio

stoi

Stoichiometric

v

volumetric

0

inlet gas

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jae Woo Chung
    • 1
  • Nam Ho Kim
    • 1
  • Deok Jin Kim
    • 1
  • Seong Sik Jang
    • 2
  1. 1.Green Car Power System R&D DivisionKorea Automotive Technology InstituteChungnamKorea
  2. 2.Keyyang Precision Co.GyeongbukKorea

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