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International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 901–909 | Cite as

Control strategy for clutch engagement during mode change of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle

  • Kyuhyun Sim
  • Sang-Min Oh
  • Choul Namkoong
  • Ji-Suk Lee
  • Kwan-Soo Han
  • Sung-Ho HwangEmail author
Article

Abstract

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) has various driving modes used in both internal combustion engine and electric motors. The EV mode uses only an electric motor and the HEV mode uses both an engine and an electric motor. Specifically, when the PHEV of a pre-transmission parallel hybrid structure performs mode changing, its engine clutch is either engaged or disengaged, which is important in terms of ride comfort. In this paper, to enhance the mode changing process for the clutch engagement, a PHEV performance simulator is developed using MATLAB/Simulink based on system dynamics and experiment data. Vehicle driving analysis is carried out of the control logic and properties of the mode changing. A compensated torque is applied during the mode change. This results in the rapid speed synchronization with the clutch although the trade-off relationship of the mode change. In addition, the mode changing is conducted through the transmission shifting process to rapidly synchronize with speed. The control strategy implemented in this study is shown to improve the drivability and energy efficiency of a PHEV.

Keywords

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Engine clutch Mode change Drivability Energy efficiency 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyuhyun Sim
    • 1
  • Sang-Min Oh
    • 1
  • Choul Namkoong
    • 2
  • Ji-Suk Lee
    • 2
  • Kwan-Soo Han
    • 3
  • Sung-Ho Hwang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringSungkyunkwan UniversityGyeonggiKorea
  2. 2.R&D Center Test TeamSECO Seojin Automotive Co., Ltd.GyeonggiKorea
  3. 3.College of EngineeringSungkyunkwan UniversityGyeonggiKorea

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