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International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 743–750 | Cite as

Reduction of preview distance in lane-keeping control

  • Keisuke Kazama
  • Kohei Nishizaki
  • Yuta Shirayama
  • Hiroyuki Furusho
  • Hiroshi Mouri
Article

Abstract

Lane marker detection is indispensable for a lane-keeping-control algorithm. However, it is impossible to detect lane markers when the curvature of the lane the vehicle is travelling on is large or when there is another car in front of the vehicle with short distance. For lane marker detection, it is desirable to set a preview point close to the vehicle. Therefore, by analyzing the block diagram of driver-vehicle system, we propose a method to reduce preview distance without lane tracking performance deterioration by increasing preview points from the conventional one point to two points. Furthermore, it is revealed that driving along a corner with constant curvature without steady-state deviation and arbitrary design of tracking dynamic characteristics become possible by increasing preview points.

Key words

Vehicle dynamics Driver model Lane-keeping assistance system Autonomous driving 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keisuke Kazama
    • 1
  • Kohei Nishizaki
    • 1
  • Yuta Shirayama
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Furusho
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Mouri
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Systems EngineeringTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyTokyoJapan

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