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International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 579–587 | Cite as

Gain-scheduled EGR control algorithm for light-duty diesel engines with static-gain parameter modeling

  • Inseok Park
  • Seungwoo Hong
  • Myoungho Sunwoo
Article
  • 115 Downloads

Abstract

This paper presents a model-based gain scheduling algorithm of a PI-based EGR controller for light-duty diesel engines. In order to capture nonlinear characteristic of the EGR system, we have proposed a new scheduling variable to illustrate the static-gain of the plant model as a linear function. The proposed scheduling variable is composed of the air-tofuel ratio of the exhaust gas and the pressure ratio between the exhaust and intake manifolds. Using the scheduling variable, a static-gain model achieved 0.94 of the R-squared value with 810 of steady-state measurements which include key engine operating conditions. Based on the model of the static-gain parameter, the gains of the PI controller are decided by Skogestad internal model control (SIMC) tuning rule in real-time. Through various scenarios of engine experiments, the proposed gain scheduling algorithm represented that the PI gains were successfully adapted according to the changes of the engine operating conditions.

Key words

Diesel engine Exhaust gas recirculation Variable geometry turbocharger Skogestad internal model control Linear parameter varying Gain scheduling 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Eco-vehicle Control Sysmtem Development TeamHyundai Motor GroupGyeonggiKorea
  2. 2.Turbo-engine Research LabHyundai Motor GroupGyeonggiKorea
  3. 3.Department of Automotive EngineeringHanyang UniversitySeoulKorea

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