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International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 17, Issue 5, pp 795–805 | Cite as

Multi-axle vehicle dynamics stability control algorithm with all independent drive wheel

  • Y. H. Shen
  • Y. Gao
  • T. Xu
Article

Abstract

The stability driving characteristic and the tire wear of 8-axle vehicle with 16-independent driving wheels are discussed in this paper. The lateral stability of 8-axle vehicle can be improved by the direct yaw moment which is generated by the 16 independent driving wheels. The hierarchical controller is designed to determine the required yaw torque and driving force of each wheel. The upper level controller uses feed-forward and feed-backward control theory to obtain the required yaw torque. The fuzzification weight ratio of two control objective is built in the upper level controller to regulate the vehicle yaw and lateral motions. The rule-based yaw moment distribution strategy and the driving force adjustment based on the safety of vehicle are proposed in the lower level controller. The influence of rear steering angle is considered in the distribution of driving force of the wheel. Simulation results of a vehicle double lane change show the stability of 8-axle vehicle under the proposed control algorithm. The wear rate of tire is calculated by the interaction force between the tire and ground. The wear of tire is different from each other for the vehicle with the stability controller or not.

Key words

Multi-axle vehicle Feed-forward and feedback control Direct yaw moment control (DYC) All independent driving wheel Wear rate of tire 

Nomenclature

m

vehicle mass

ki

linear cornering coefficient of the i th tire

δi

steering angle of each axle

li

distance between i th axle and mass center

I

rotational inertia of vehicle

u

longitudinal velocity of vehicle

v

lateral velocity

r

yaw rate

β

side-slip angle of the center of mass

Li5

distance between the i th axle and 5th axle

Mz

yaw moment

Mff

feed-forward yaw moment compensation

Mfb

feed-backward yaw moment compensation

rd

ideal yaw rate

βd

ideal side-slip angle of center of mass

mi, ni

lever arm coefficient of left and right wheel

δ1

the inner steering angle

B

wheel base

Fxmax

maximum adhesive force of the road

p

instability coefficient

a

weighted coefficient

ΔFb

the total adjustment of driving force by p

μs

coefficient of road adhesive

Fyi

lateral force of the tire

β|

error of side-slip angle

r|

error of yaw rate

FZin

the sum of vertical force of 8-j inner wheels

FZout

the sum of vertical force of 8-j outer wheels

Txi

actual output torque of driving wheel

Fxi

actual driving force of wheels

Flim

maximum driving force limited by motor

rr

rolling diameter of wheel

W

frictional work of tire wear

Ft

tire force acting on road

Fx

longitudinal force

Fy

lateral force

Vx

longitudinal slip velocity of each wheel

Vy

lateral slip velocity of each wheel

λ

longitudinal slip ratio

α

side slip angle of the wheel

C0

tire fatigue wear

P

tire vertical load

P0

tire rated load

n

vertical load index

bx

relative wear coefficient by longitudinal force

by

relative wear coefficient by lateral force

S

real travelling distance

S0

standard distance

ε

influence of the road

Gff

proportional gain coefficient of feed-forward controller

lLi, lRi

lever arm from steering wheel to vehicle mass center

ΔFLia, ΔFRia

adjustment of driving force by M z

FZLi, FZRi

dynamic loading of the left, right wheel

δouti, δini

the outer and inner steering angle of i th axle

ΔFLib, ΔFRib

adjustment of driving force by p

FLxi, FRxi

actual driving force of each wheel

FLxi0, FRxi0

initial distribution driving force

ΔFLi, ΔFRi

adjustment of driving force

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Science and Technology BeijingBeijingChina

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