Economic Botany

, Volume 62, Issue 3, pp 269–277 | Cite as

Matsutake Trade in Yunnan Province, China: An Overview

  • Xuefei Yang
  • Jun He
  • Chun Li
  • Jianzhong Ma
  • Yongping Yang
  • Jianchu Xu
Special Mushroom Issue

Abstract

Matsutake Trade in Yunnan Province, China: An Overview. Matsutake are economically important wild mushrooms that contribute greatly to rural livelihoods and local economies in many parts of the northern hemisphere. This paper provides an overview of the matsutake trade in Yunnan province, China, where increased attention is being given to the sustainable utilization of nontimber forest products. Topics covered include the distribution, production, and export of matsutake in Yunnan, and the market chain for matsutake in Yunnan, whereby matsutake are harvested from the wild and exported to Japan within 48 hours.

Key Words

Matsutake mushroom trade Yunnan 

Literature Cited

  1. Cunningham, A. B., ed. 2001. Applied Ethnobotany: People, Wild Plant Use and Conservation. People and Plants Conservation Manuals. Earthscan Publications, Ltd., London.Google Scholar
  2. Gong, M. and F. Wang. 2004. The Countermeasures of China to Present Market Status of Tricholoma matsutake [in Chinese]. Territory and Natural Resources Study (2):88–89.Google Scholar
  3. Hosford, D., D. Pilz, R. Molina, and M. Amaranthus. 1997. Ecology and Management of the Commercially Harvested American Matsutake Mushroom. PNW-GTR-412, United States Department of Agriculture Ecology and Management of Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station.Google Scholar
  4. James, F. W. 1998. Management Experiments for High-Elevation Agroforestry Systems Jointly Producing Matsutake Mushrooms and High-Quality Timber in the Cascade Range of Southern Oregon. PNW-GTR-424, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland.Google Scholar
  5. Liu, P., M. Yan, X. Wang, P. Sun, and X. Yang. 1999. Notes on the Resources of Matsutake-Group and Their Reasonable Utilization as Well as Effective Conservation in China [in Chinese]. Journal of Natural Resources 143:245–252.Google Scholar
  6. Ogawa, M. 1976. Microbial Ecology of Mycorrhizal Fungus, Tricholoma matsutake (Ito et Imai) Sing. in Pine Forest. III. Funal Florae in Shiro Soil and on the Mycorrhiza. 293. The Government Forest Experiment Station, Tokyo, Japan.Google Scholar
  7. Saito, H. and G. Mitsumata, 2008. Bidding Customs and Habitat Improvement for Matsutake (Tricholoma matsutake) in Japan. Economic Botany [this issue].Google Scholar
  8. Wang, Y., I. R. Hall, and L. A. Evans. 1997. Ectomycorrhizal Fungi with Edible Fruiting Bodies. 1. Tricholoma Matsutake and Related Fungi. Economic Botany 513:311–327.Google Scholar
  9. Wills, R. M. and R. G. Lipsey. 1999. An Economic Strategy to Develop Non-timber Forest Products and Services in British Columbia. Forest Renewal BC Project No. PA 97538-ORE, Cognetics International Research, Inc., Bowen Island.Google Scholar
  10. Xu, J. and J. Ribot. 2004. Decentralization and Accountability in Forest Management Case from Yunnan, Southwest China. The European Journal of Development Research 141:153–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. ——— and A. Wilkes. 2004. Biodiversity Impact Analysis in Northwest Yunnan, Southwest China. Biodiversity and Conservation 135:959–983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Yeh, E. T. 2000. Forest Claims, Conflicts and Commodification: The Political Ecology of Tibetan Mushroom-Harvesting Villages in Yunnan Province, China. China Quarterly(161):264–278.Google Scholar
  13. Zang, M. 1990. A Taxonomic and Geographic Study on the Song Rong (Matsutake) Group and Its Allied Species [in Chinese]. Acta Mycologica Sinica 92:113–127.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuefei Yang
    • 1
  • Jun He
    • 2
  • Chun Li
    • 3
  • Jianzhong Ma
    • 4
  • Yongping Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianchu Xu
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biogeography and Biodiversity, Kunming Institute of BotanyChinese Academy of SciencesKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Center of Mountain Ecosystem StudiesICRAF China Country ProgrammeKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.The Endangered Species Import and Export Management Office of the People’s Republic of China, Kunming OfficeKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.The Nature Conservancy, Kunming OfficeChina Country ProgrammeKunmingPeople’s Republic of China

Personalised recommendations