American Journal of Potato Research

, Volume 94, Issue 4, pp 379–389 | Cite as

Sage Russet: a New High Yielding Russet Potato Variety with Cold-Sweetening Resistance, High Vitamin C and Protein Contents and Excellent Fresh Pack and Processing Potential

  • S. Yilma
  • B. A. Charlton
  • C. C. Shock
  • D. C. Hane
  • S. R. James
  • A. R. Mosley
  • K. A. Rykbost
  • E. B. G. Feibert
  • N. R. Knowles
  • M. J. Pavek
  • J. C. Stark
  • R. G. Novy
  • J. L. Whitworth
  • J. J. Pavek
  • D. L. Corsini
  • T. L. Brandt
  • N. Olsen
  • C. R. Brown
  • M. I. Vales
  • V. Sathuvalli
Article

Abstract

Sage Russet was released in 2009 by Oregon State University, in cooperation with the USDA-ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho and Washington. It is a product of the Northwest Potato Variety (Tri-State) Development Program. Sage Russet has a medium-early maturity and produces long, somewhat flattened tubers with medium russeting of the skin. Total yields of Sage Russet are similar to those of Russet Burbank and Ranger Russet, but are significantly higher than those of Russet Norkotah. Sage Russet has significantly higher U.S. No.1 yields than Russet Burbank, Russet Norkotah, and Ranger Russet. It can be grown as an early or late crop with high U.S. No.1 yields and minimal internal defects. It achieved very high merit scores in processing and fresh market in Western Regional trials and can be considered for both markets. Sage Russet has a medium to high fertility requirements with high nitrogen use efficiency and medium storage capability. Sage Russet has moderate specific gravity and produces lighter fry color than the industry standard varieties. The color of fried strips following tuber storage at 4.4 °C and 7.2 °C is significantly lighter for Sage Russet than the control varieties, indicating good cold sweetening resistance. Chemical analyses have shown that Sage Russet has higher protein and vitamin C content than control varieties. Sage Russet is moderately resistant to early dying, early blight, and common scab, is resistant to tuber late blight, but susceptible to Fusarium wilt and is prone to shatter bruise.

Keywords

Solanum tuberosum Breeding Variety Fry color Glucose 

Resumen

Sage Ruset se liberó en 2009 por la Universidad del Estado de Oregon, en cooperación con el USDA-ARS y las Estaciones Agrícolas Experimentales de Idaho y Washington. Es un producto del Programa Triestatal de Desarrollo de Variedades Noroccidental. Sage Russet tiene una madurez de media a precoz y produce tubérculos largos, algo aplanados, con piel tipo russet intermedia. Los rendimientos totales de esta variedad son similares a los de Russet Burbank y Ranger Russet, pero son significativamente más altos que los de Russet Norkotah. Sage Russet tiene rendimientos significativamente más altos de U.S. No. 1 que Russet Burbank, Russet Norkotah y Ranger Russet. Puede sembrarse como un cultivo temprano o tardío, con altos rendimientos de U.S. No. 1 y defectos internos mínimos. Logró puntuaciones muy altas en procesamiento y mercado fresco en ensayos regionales del oeste y puede considerarse para ambos mercados. Sage Russet tiene requerimientos de fertilización de medios a altos con alta eficiencia de uso del nitrógeno y capacidad media de almacenamiento. Esta variedad tiene gravedad específica moderada y produce un color más claro de freído que las variedades estándar de la industria. El color de las tiras freídas después del almacenamiento del tubérculo a 4.4 °C y 7.2 °C es significativamente más claro para Sage Russet que para las variedades testigo, indicando buena resistencia al endulzamiento por frío. Los análisis químicos han mostrado que Sage Russet tiene más alto contenidos de proteína y vitamina C que las variedades estándar. Esta variedad es moderadamente resistente a la muerte temprana, al tizón temprano y a la roña común. Es resistente al tizón tardío en tubérculo pero es susceptible a la marchitez por Fusarium y es propensa a daño mecánico.

References

  1. Bergers, W.W. 1980. A rapid quantitative assay for solanidine glycoalkaloids in potatoes and industrial potato protein. Potato Research 23: 105–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Corsini, D.L., and J.J. Pavek. 1986. Fusarium dry–rot resistant potato germplasm. Am Potato J 63: 629–638.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Corsini, D.L., J.J. Pavek, and J.R. Davis. 1988. Verticillium wilt resistance in non-cultivated tuber-bearing Solanum species. Plant Disease 75: 148–151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Corsini, D.L., J.J. Pavek, M.W. Martin, and C.R. Brown. 1994. Potato germplasm with combined resistance to leafroll virus and viruses X and Y. Am Potato J 71: 377–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Horwiz, W (ed) 2000. Official methods of analysis handbook. Published by the association of official analytical chemists.Google Scholar
  6. Knowles, N.R., M.J. Pavek, and L.O. Knowles. 2015. Developmental profiles, nitrogen use and postharvest quality of alpine and sage russet potatoes in the Columbia Basin. Annual Washington and Oregon potato conference, Jan. 27–30, 37–50. WA: Kennewick.Google Scholar
  7. Mosley A. S., Yilma, D. Hane, S. James, K. Rykbost, C. Shock, B. Charlton, E. Eldredge, and L. Leroux. 2013. Oregon. In: K.G. Haynes (ed), National Potato Germplasm Evaluation and Enhancement Report, 2001: Seventy –Second Annual Report by Cooperators. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, ARS. pp. 369–388.Google Scholar
  8. Pavek, J.J., D.L. Corsini, D.R. Douglas, R.E. Ohms, J.G. Garner, H.C. McKay, C. Stanger, G.E. Vogt, W.C. Sparks, R. Kunkel, J.R. Davis, A.J. Walz, C.E. Dallimore, and J. Augustin. 1978. Butte: a long russet potato variety with excellent dehydrating quality. Am Potato J 55: 685–690.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Pavek, J.J., D.L. Corsini, J.G. Garner, S. Michener, W.C. Sparks, G.F. Carnahan, C.E. Stanger, A.R. Mosley, M.J. Johnson, G.E. Carter, R.E. Voss, M.W. Martin, and R.H. Johansen. 1981. Lemhi russet: a new, high yielding potato variety with wide adaptation, attractive tubers, and high internal quality. Am Potato J 58: 619–625.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Pavek, J.J., D.L. Corsini, S.L. Love, D.C. Hane, D.G. Holm, W.M. Iritani, S.R. James, M.W. Martin, A.R. Mosley, J.C. Ojala, C.E. Stanger, and R.E. Thornton. 1992. Ranger russet: a long russet potato variety for processing and fresh market with improved quality, disease resistance, and yield. Am Potato J 69: 483–488.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Ross, F.A. 1959. Dinitrophenol method for reducing sugars. In Potato Processing, ed. W.F. Talburt and O. Smith, 469–470. Westport: AVI Publ.Google Scholar
  12. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service. 1997. United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes. p 2.Google Scholar
  13. Yilma, S., M.I. Vales, B.A. Charlton, D.C. Hane, S.R. James, C.C. Shock, A.R. Mosley, D. Culp, E. Feibert, L. Leroux, E. Karaagac, N.R. Knowles, M.J. Pavek, J.C. Stark, R.G. Novy, J.L. Whitworth, J.J. Pavek, D.L. Corsini, T.L. Brandt, N. Olsen, and C.R. Brown. 2012. Owyhee russet: a variety with high yields of U.S. no. 1 tubers, excellent processing quality, and moderate resistance to Fusarium dry rot (Fusarium solani var. coeruleum). American Journal of Potato Research 89: 175–183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Potato Association of America 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Yilma
    • 1
  • B. A. Charlton
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. C. Shock
    • 1
    • 3
  • D. C. Hane
    • 1
  • S. R. James
    • 1
  • A. R. Mosley
    • 1
  • K. A. Rykbost
    • 1
  • E. B. G. Feibert
    • 3
  • N. R. Knowles
    • 4
  • M. J. Pavek
    • 4
  • J. C. Stark
    • 5
  • R. G. Novy
    • 6
  • J. L. Whitworth
    • 6
  • J. J. Pavek
    • 7
  • D. L. Corsini
    • 7
  • T. L. Brandt
    • 8
  • N. Olsen
    • 8
  • C. R. Brown
    • 9
  • M. I. Vales
    • 10
  • V. Sathuvalli
    • 1
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Crop & Soil ScienceOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  2. 2.Klamath Basin R&E CenterOregon State UniversityKlamath FallsUSA
  3. 3.Malheur Experiment StationOregon State UniversityOntarioUSA
  4. 4.Department of HorticultureWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  5. 5.Idaho Falls R&E CenterUniversity of IdahoIdaho FallsUSA
  6. 6.U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Aberdeen R&E CenterAberdeenUSA
  7. 7.USDA-ARSAberdeenUSA
  8. 8.Kimberly R&E CenterUniversity of IdahoKimberlyUSA
  9. 9.USDA-ARSProsserUSA
  10. 10.Department of Horticultural SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  11. 11.Hermiston Agricultural R&E CenterOregon State UniversityHermistonUSA

Personalised recommendations