American Journal of Potato Research

, Volume 87, Issue 4, pp 360–373 | Cite as

Classic Russet: A Potato Cultivar with Excellent Fresh Market Characteristics and High Yields of U.S. No. 1 Tubers Suitable for Early Harvest or Full-Season Production

  • Jeffrey C. Stark
  • Richard G. Novy
  • Jonathan L. Whitworth
  • N. R. Knowles
  • Mark J. Pavek
  • Steve L. Love
  • M. I. Vales
  • S. R. James
  • D. C. Hane
  • C. R. Brown
  • B. A. Charlton
  • Dennis L. Corsini
  • J. J. Pavek
  • Nora Olsen
  • T. Brandt
Article

Abstract

Classic Russet is a medium maturing potato cultivar with rapid tuber bulking making it suitable for early harvest, as well as full-season production. Classic Russet is notable for its attractive tubers with medium russet skin and excellent culinary characteristics. It resulted from a 1995 cross between Blazer Russet and Summit Russet and was released in 2009 by the USDA-ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho, Oregon and Washington and is a product of the Northwest Potato Variety (Tri-State) Development Program. Classic Russet also shows potential as an early season processing cultivar, with fry color comparable to Russet Burbank and Ranger Russet. Classic Russet total yields were comparable to Russet Norkotah and Ranger Russet in early harvest trials and comparable to Ranger Russet and Russet Burbank in full season trials. When averaged across sites in early harvest or full season trials, U.S. No. 1 yields of Classic Russet were generally greater than those of Russet Norkotah, Ranger Russet, and Russet Burbank. Protein content for Classic Russet is relatively high, averaging 22% higher than Ranger Russet, 32% higher than Russet Burbank and 24% higher than Russet Norkotah. Specific gravity of Classic Russet in early harvest trials was comparable to Russet Norkotah but lower than Ranger Russet and was similar to Russet Burbank in full season trials. The incidence of hollow heart in Classic Russet is low, similar to that of Ranger Russet. It is less susceptible to blackspot bruise than Russet Burbank, Ranger Russet and Russet Norkotah but shatter bruise can be a concern if not matured properly prior to harvest. Classic Russet is moderately resistant to common scab and dry rot and is moderately susceptible to foliar and tuber infections of early blight and symptoms of corky ringspot. It is susceptible to Verticillium wilt, soft rot, foliar and tuber late blight, PLRV and PLRV net necrosis, and the common strain of potato virus Y (PVY°).

Keywords

Solanum tuberosum Variety Breeding Processing 

Resumen

Classic Russet es una variedad de papa de madurez media con llenado rápido de tubérculo, haciéndola deseable para cosecha temprana, así como para producción de ciclo completo. Classic Russet es notable por sus tubérculos atractivos con piel corchosa intermedia y de características culinarias excelentes. Fue el resultado de una cruza de 1995 entre Blazer Russet y Summit Russet y se liberó en el 2009 por el USDA-ARS y las estaciones agrícolas experimentales de Idaho, Oregon y Washington y es un producto del Programa de Desarrollo de Variedades de Papa del Noroeste (Tri-State). Classic Russet también presenta potencial de una variedad temprana para proceso, con el color del freído comparable a Russet Burbank y Ranger Russet. Los rendimientos totales de Classic Russet fueron comparables a los de Russet Norkotah y Ranger Russet en ensayos de cosecha temprana y comparable a Ranger Russet y Russet Burbank en ensayos de ciclo completo. Cuando se promedió transversalmente en los sitios de los ensayos de ciclos corto y completo, los rendimientos de U.S. No. 1 de Classic Russet fueron generalmente mayores que los de Russet Norkotah, Ranger Russet, y Russet Burbank. El contenido protéico de Classic Russet es relativamente alto, promediando 22% mayor que Ranger Russet, 32% más alto que Russet Burbank y 24% más que Russet Norkotah. La gravedad específica de Classic Russet en los ensayos de cosecha temprana fue comparable a la de Russet Norkotah pero más baja que Ranger Russet y similar a la de Russet Burbank en ensayos de temporada completa. La incidencia de corazón hueco en Classic Russet es baja, similar a la de Ranger Russet. Es menos susceptible al oscurecimiento por daño mecánico que Russet Burbank, Ranger Russet y Russet Norkotah, pero la desintegración por golpes puede ser de cuidado si no se ha madurado apropiadamente antes de la cosecha. Classic Russet es moderadamente resistente a la roña común y a la pudrición seca y es moderadamente susceptible a las infecciones foliares y de tubérculo de tizón temprano y a los síntomas de la mancha anular corchosa. Es susceptible al marchitamiento por Verticillium, a la pudrición blanda, al tizón tardío en el follaje y en el tubérculo, PLRV y a la necrosis neta por PLRV, y a la variante común de virus Y (PVY°).

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Copyright information

© Potato Association of America 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey C. Stark
    • 1
  • Richard G. Novy
    • 2
  • Jonathan L. Whitworth
    • 2
  • N. R. Knowles
    • 3
  • Mark J. Pavek
    • 3
  • Steve L. Love
    • 4
  • M. I. Vales
    • 5
  • S. R. James
    • 6
  • D. C. Hane
    • 7
  • C. R. Brown
    • 8
  • B. A. Charlton
    • 9
  • Dennis L. Corsini
    • 10
  • J. J. Pavek
    • 10
  • Nora Olsen
    • 11
  • T. Brandt
    • 12
  1. 1.Idaho Falls R&E CenterUniversity of IdahoIdaho FallsUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agricultural Research Service (ARS)Aberdeen R&E CenterAberdeenUSA
  3. 3.Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  4. 4.Aberdeen R & E CenterUniversity of IdahoAberdeenUSA
  5. 5.Oregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  6. 6.Central Oregon Ag Research CenterOregon State UniversityMadrasUSA
  7. 7.Hermiston Agricultural R&E CenterOregon State UniversityHermistonUSA
  8. 8.USDA/ARSProsserUSA
  9. 9.Klamath Basin R&E CenterOregon State UniversityKlamath FallsUSA
  10. 10.Retired from the USDA-ARSAberdeenUSA
  11. 11.Twin Falls R & E CenterUniversity of IdahoTwin FallsUSA
  12. 12.Kimberly R&E CenterUniversity of IdahoKimberlyUSA

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