American Journal of Potato Research

, Volume 87, Issue 4, pp 327–336 | Cite as

Yukon Gem: A Yellow-Fleshed Potato Cultivar Suitable for Fresh-Pack and Processing with Resistances to PVYO and Late Blight

  • Jonathan L. Whitworth
  • Richard G. Novy
  • Jeffrey C. Stark
  • Joseph J. Pavek
  • Dennis L. Corsini
  • Steven L. Love
  • Jeffrey S. Miller
  • M. Isabel Vales
  • Alvin R. Mosley
  • Solomon Yilma
  • Steve R. James
  • Dan C. Hane
  • Brian A. Charlton
  • Charles R. Brown
  • N. Richard Knowles
  • Mark J. Pavek
Article

Abstract

Yukon Gem is a yellow-fleshed, medium to early-maturing cultivar suitable for fresh-pack or processing with a high level of resistance to potato virus YO, and moderate foliar and tuber resistance to late blight. Multiple trials demonstrated a higher yield potential than Yukon Gold (yellow-fleshed industry standard). Yukon Gem produces uniform attractive tubers with light yellow skin and splashes of pink around the eyes; with flesh color similar to Yukon Gold. Yukon Gem was obtained from the intercrossing of Brodick and Yukon Gold at North Dakota State University (NDSU). An NDSU seedling tuber was sent and selected at Aberdeen, ID in 1995 and designated NDA5507-3YF. It advanced through the Aberdeen potato breeding program and regional trials in the western and northwestern U.S. Yukon Gem was released in 2006 by the USDA-ARS and the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and is a product of the Northwest Potato Variety (Tri-State) Development Program.

Keywords

Solanum tuberosum Variety Breeding Virus resistance Phytophthora infestans 

Resumen

Yukon Gem es una variedad de pulpa amarilla, de ciclo medio a temprano, ideal para empaque fresco o para proceso con un alto nivel de resistencia al virus YO, con moderada resistencia del follaje y del tubérculo al tizón tardío. Se ha demostrado en múltiples ensayos un potencial de rendimiento más alto que Yukon Gold (pulpa amarilla, estándar para la industria). Yukon Gem produce tubérculos uniformes atractivos con piel ligeramente amarilla y algo de rosado alrededor de los ojos; con color de pulpa similar al de Yukon Gold. Yukon Gem se obtuvo del entrecruzamiento de Brodick y Yukon Gold en la Universidad Estatal de Dakota del Norte (NDSU). Se envió un minitubérculo de NDSU y se seleccionó en Aberdeen, ID en 1995, designándosele NDA5507-3YF. Avanzó a lo largo del programa de mejoramiento de papa de Aberdeen y en las pruebas regionales en el oeste y noroeste de EUA. Yukon Gem se liberó en el 2006 por el USDA-ARS y por las Estaciones Agrícolas Experimentales de Idaho, Oregon, y Washington, y es un producto del Programa de Desarrollo de Variedades de Papa del Noroeste (Tri-State).

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Copyright information

© Potato Association of America 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan L. Whitworth
    • 1
  • Richard G. Novy
    • 1
  • Jeffrey C. Stark
    • 2
  • Joseph J. Pavek
    • 3
  • Dennis L. Corsini
    • 3
  • Steven L. Love
    • 2
  • Jeffrey S. Miller
    • 4
  • M. Isabel Vales
    • 5
  • Alvin R. Mosley
    • 6
  • Solomon Yilma
    • 5
  • Steve R. James
    • 7
  • Dan C. Hane
    • 8
  • Brian A. Charlton
    • 9
  • Charles R. Brown
    • 10
  • N. Richard Knowles
    • 11
  • Mark J. Pavek
    • 11
  1. 1.U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture Research ServiceAberdeen Research & Extension CenterAberdeenUSA
  2. 2.University of IdahoAberdeenUSA
  3. 3.U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture Research ServiceAberdeenUSA
  4. 4.Miller ResearchRupertUSA
  5. 5.Oregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  6. 6.Oregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  7. 7.Oregon State UniversityMadrasUSA
  8. 8.Oregon State UniversityHermistonUSA
  9. 9.Oregon State UniversityKlamath FallsUSA
  10. 10.United States Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research ServiceProsserUSA
  11. 11.Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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