Advertisement

American Journal of Potato Research

, Volume 86, Issue 5, pp 406–414 | Cite as

Freedom Russet—A Dual Purpose Russet Potato Cultivar with Resistance to Common Scab and Good Fry Quality

  • Horia I. Groza
  • Bryan D. Bowen
  • Alvin J. Bussan
  • Felix M. Navarro
  • Walt R. Stevenson
  • Jiwan P. Palta
  • Jiming Jiang
Article

Abstract

Freedom Russet was developed from a cross between ND14-1, a parent with scab resistance, and W1005rus, a parent with good processing quality. It is a mid-season cultivar and can be used for dual purposes for both fresh market and processing. The tubers of Freedom Russet are oblong-long with medium-dark russet skin, and have an attractive appearance. Freedom Russet tubers have better external and internal qualities than Russet Burbank tubers. The total and US No. 1 yield of Freedom Russet is equal to or higher than Russet Burbank in most environments. The specific gravity of Freedom Russet is similar or 1–3 unit less than Russet Burbank. Freedom Russet produced better fry color than Russet Burbank when processed after storage at 10, 8.9, and 7.2°C. It showed similar susceptibility to both early blight and late blight compared to Russet Burbank. Freedom Russet is resistant to common scab and moderately resistant to powdery scab. It is similarly susceptible to soft rot and pink rot as Russet Burbank, and clearly expresses bacterial ring rot symptoms. Freedom Russet is tolerant to Verticillium wilt and showed better yield potential than Russet Burbank under early dying pressure.

Keywords

Solanum tuberosum L. Fresh market French fry 

Resumen

Freedom Russet fue desarrollado a partir de un cruce entre ND14-1, un progenitor con resistencia a sarna, y W1005rus, un progenitor con buena calidad de procesamiento. Es un cultivar de estación media y se puede utilizar para doble propósito tanto para mercado fresco como para procesamiento. Los tubérculos de Freedom Russet son oblongo-largos con cáscara medianamente oscura rugosa, y tienen una apariencia atractiva. Los tubérculos de Freedom Russet tienen mejores cualidades externas e internas que los tubérculos de Russet Burbank. El rendimiento total y US No. 1 es igual o superior a Russet Burbank en la mayoría de los ambientes. La gravedad específica de Freedom Russet es similar o inferior en 1–3 unidad a Russet Burbank. Freedom Russet produce mejor color de hojuelas fritas que Russet Burbank cuando procesado tras el almacenamiento a 10, 8.9, y 7.2°C. Mostró susceptibilidad similar a ambos tizón temprano y tizón tardío en comparación con Russet Burbank. Freedom Russet es resistente a la sarna común y moderadamente resistente a la roña. Es igualmente susceptible a la pudrición blanda y pudrición rosada como Russet Burbank, y expresa claramente síntomas de pudrición bacterial anular. Freedom Russet es tolerante a la marchités por Verticillium y mostró mejor potencial de rendimiento que Russet Burbank ante presión de muerte prematura.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank David Douches, Michigan State University, for establishing the isozyme identity of Freedom Russet, and Martin Glynn, USDA/ARS, at the Potato Research Worksite in East Grand Forks, Minnesota, for the frying tests of all the samples of the North Central Regional Trials. The Wisconsin potato breeding program is financially supported by USDA/CSREES, the Wisconsin Potato and Vegetable Growers Association, and Hatch funds.

References

  1. Binning, L.K., B.A. Michaelis, R.H. Hughes, R.A. Rittmeyer, W.G. Schmitt, and D.J. Heider. 2003. Sencor Variety Trial – Hancock 2002. Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, 271-276. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  2. Christ, B.J., X. Qu, and S.R. May. 2005. Severity of powdery scab on potato cultivars and breeding lines, 2004. In Pennsylvania Potato Research Report, 2004-2005, 2007, ed. B.J. Christ, Pennsylvania State University.Google Scholar
  3. Christ, B.J., X. Qu, and S.R. May. 2006. Severity of powdery scab on potato cultivars and breeding lines, 2004. In Pennsylvania Potato Research Report, 2004-2005, 2007, ed. B.J. Christ, Pennsylvania State University.Google Scholar
  4. Christ, B.J., X. Qu, and S.R. May. 2008. Severity of powdery scab on potato cultivars and breeding lines, 2004. In Pennsylvania Potato Research Report, 2004-2005, 2007, ed. B.J. Christ, Pennsylvania State University.Google Scholar
  5. Douches, D. and K. Ludlam. 1991. Electrophoretic characterization of North American potato cultivars. American Potato Journal 68: 767–780.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Glynn, M. and J. Sowokinos. 2005. Storage Performance of Advanced Breeding Clones. Valley Potato Growers 70: 18–20.Google Scholar
  7. Jiang, J., H. Groza, and B. Bowen. 2004. Results of the Wisconsin Potato Breeding Program in 2003. Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, 151-160. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Google Scholar
  8. Halseth, D.E., E.R. Sandsted, W.L. Hymes, R.L. MacLaury, J.M. Kelly and D.A. Hoy. 2005. 2004. Upstate New York Potato Variety Trials and Cultural Practice Experiments, Horticulture Report, nr. 30, January.Google Scholar
  9. Jiang, J., H. Groza, and B. Bowen. 2003. Results of the Wisconsin Potato Breeding Program in 2002. Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, 143-150. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  10. Kostichka, C.J. 2004. Wisconsin Potato Variety and Advanced Selection Evaluation Trial – 2003. Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 163-193. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  11. LeMere, M.T. 2007. The effects of fumigation, nitrogen fertility, and varietal resistance to early dying (Verticillium dahliae) and early blight (Alternaria solani) on the potato production environment. M.S. thesis, University of Wisconsin-MadisonGoogle Scholar
  12. Navarro, F., B. Bowen, J. Jiang, H. Groza, and J. Palta. 2006. Development of Varieties with Enhanced Resistance to Common Scab. Preliminary Results (2000-2005). Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, 135-142. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  13. Navarro, F., B. Bowen and J. Palta. 2007. Potato Breeding Program Research Update. Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, 151-176. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  14. Navarro, F., B. Bowen and J. Palta. 2008. Potato Breeding Program Research Update. Proceedings of Wisconsin’s Annual Potato Meetings, 109-125. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  15. Porter, G.A., P.C. Ocaya, B. MacFairline, P. Wardell, and B. Plummer. 2001. 2001-2003 Maine Potato Variety Trials, NE184 Regional Trials and Advanced Breeding Lines, Exeter, Presque Isle, and St. Agatha, Maine.Google Scholar
  16. Porter, G.A., P.C. Ocaya, B. MacFairline, P. Wardell, and B. Plummer. 2002. 2001-2003 Maine Potato Variety Trials, NE184 Regional Trials and Advanced Breeding Lines, Exeter, Presque Isle, and St. Agatha, Maine.Google Scholar
  17. Porter, G.A., P.C. Ocaya, B. MacFairline, P. Wardell, and B. Plummer. 2003. 2001-2003 Maine Potato Variety Trials, NE184 Regional Trials and Advanced Breeding Lines, Exeter, Presque Isle, and St. Agatha, Maine.Google Scholar
  18. Porter, G.A., P.C. Ocaya, B. MacFairline, and B. Plummer. 2004. 2004-2005 Maine Potato Variety Trials, NE184 Regional Trials and Advanced Breeding Lines, Exeter, Presque Isle, and St. Agatha, Maine.Google Scholar
  19. Porter, G.A., P.C. Ocaya, B. MacFairline, and B. Plummer. 2005. 2004-2005 Maine Potato Variety Trials, NE184 Regional Trials and Advanced Breeding Lines, Exeter, Presque Isle, and St. Agatha, Maine.Google Scholar
  20. Sabba, R.P., P. Holman, M.J. Drilias, and A.J. Bussan. 2008. Influence of maleic hydrazide on yield and sugars in potato. Am. J. Potato Res. (submitted).Google Scholar
  21. Stevenson, W.R., R.V. James, and R.E. Rand. 2002. Wisconsin Vegetable Disease Control Trials, 23-33, 35-38 and 43-44. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  22. Stevenson, W.R., R.V. James, and R.E. Rand. 2003. Wisconsin Vegetable Disease Control Trials, 33-34 and 47-50. University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  23. Thill, C., D. Lynch, A. Sullivan, D. Douches, A. Pavlista, H. Groza, A. Thompson, M. Kleinhenz, and B. Summers. 2002. 2001 North Central Regional Potato Variety Trials, University of Minnesota.Google Scholar
  24. Thill, C., D. Lynch, A. Sullivan, D. Douches, A. Pavlista, and H. Groza. 2003. 2002 North Central Regional Potato Variety Trials, University of Minnesota.Google Scholar
  25. Thill, C., D. Lynch, A. Sullivan, D. Douches, A. Pavlista, H. Groza, and A. Thompson. 2004. 2003 North Central Regional Potato Variety Trials, University of Minnesota.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Potato Association of America 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Horia I. Groza
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bryan D. Bowen
    • 2
  • Alvin J. Bussan
    • 1
  • Felix M. Navarro
    • 1
    • 2
  • Walt R. Stevenson
    • 3
  • Jiwan P. Palta
    • 1
  • Jiming Jiang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Rhinelander Agricultural Research StationUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonRhinelanderUSA
  3. 3.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

Personalised recommendations