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Kew Bulletin

, 71:13 | Cite as

Barleria mirabilis (Acanthaceae): a remarkable new tree species from west Tanzania

  • Iain Darbyshire
  • Quentin Luke
Article

Summary

A new species of Barleria (Acanthaceae), discovered in 2014 on the Uzondo Plateau of West Tanzania, is described and illustrated and its affinities are discussed. This is the first documented tree species in the genus Barleria. Its conservation status is assessed using the categories and criteria of IUCN; it is considered to be globally Vulnerable.

Key Words

conservation IUCN Red List assessment Mpanda taxonomy Uzondo 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to The Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) for granting the Research Clearances which allowed the collecting trips in 2014 to be carried out. Maria Vorontosova is thanked for her field collaboration; funding for fieldwork in western Tanzania was granted by the Kew Herbarium Fieldwork Fund. Itambo Malombe (EA) is thanked for facilitating the loan of the type material to Kew. The authors are particularly grateful to Andrew Brown for the detailed illustration of the new species. We also thank Kaj Vollesen for providing helpful information on the type locality and its flora.

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Copyright information

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Herbarium, Royal Botanic Gardens, KewRichmondUK
  2. 2.East African HerbariumNational Museums of KenyaNairobiKenya

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