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Kew Bulletin

, Volume 67, Issue 4, pp 751–758 | Cite as

Taxonomic dissolution of Sarcostemma (Apocynaceae: Asclepiadoideae)

  • Ulrich MeveEmail author
  • Sigrid Liede-Schumann
Article

Summary

Since molecular analyses have demonstrated that Sarcostemma R. Br. is deeply nested in the predominantly Madagascan stem-succulent clade of Cynanchum L., the genus has been treated as a synonym of Cynanchum. Some of the former Sarcostemma species have been transferred to Cynanchum in the course of various Flora treatments, and some new species belonging to this radiation have been described under Cynanchum. The present contribution serves to complete the formal transfer of Sarcostemma taxa to Cynanchum, in which a total of nine species are concerned: Cynanchum arabicum, C. areysianum, C. brevipedicellatum, C. daltonii, C. forskaolianum, C. mulanjense, C. pearsonianum (a substitute name for Cynanchum pearsonii), C. sarcomedium (a substitute name for C. intermedium), and C. socotranum. In addition, six subspecies of Cynanchum viminale are newly combined: C. viminale subsp. australe, C. viminale subsp. brunonianum, C. viminale subsp. orangeanum, C. viminale subsp. stocksii, C. viminale subsp. thunbergii and C. viminale subsp. welwitschii. Finally, notes on recent introductions from southern Yemen are made, and illustrations of Cynanchum areysianum are provided.

Key Words

Cynanchum Cynanchum areysianum new combinations Old World taxonomy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are very grateful to John J. Lavranos and Dr Bruno Mies, who provided us with living plant material from southern Yemen, and to G for scanning type specimens of C. Wright.

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Copyright information

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Plant SystematicsUniversity of BayreuthBayreuthGermany

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