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Kew Bulletin

, Volume 63, Issue 2, pp 277–287 | Cite as

Typification of Pallas’ names in Salix

  • Irina BelyaevaEmail author
  • Alexander Sennikov
Article

Summary

The original collections of Salix species described by Pallas are discussed. Eight names validated by Pallas and one by Nasarov are typified. The use of six currently accepted names, S. arbutifolia Pall., S. arctica Pall., S. berberifolia Pall., S. caspica Pall., S. divaricata Pall. and S. rhamnifolia Pall., is confirmed. Salix serotina Pall. retains its place as a synonym of S. viminalis L. Salix gmelinii Pall. is resurrected and proposed as the correct name for the taxon previously known as S. dasyclados Wimm. S. burjatica Nasarow and S. jacutica Nasarow, the old synonyms of S. dasyclados, therefore are now also synonyms of S. gmelinii. A new combination S. rosmarinifolia L. subsp. sibirica is proposed.

Keywords

Historical collections nomenclature Pallas Salix taxonomy typification 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Dr Dmitry Geltman (LE), Dr Roy Vickery, Dr Steve Cafferty, Dr Mark Spencer and Dr Jonathan Gregson (BM), Dr Arne Anderberg, Dr Jens Klackenberg and Dr Tomas Karlsson (S), Mrs Gina Douglas (LINN) for their help with our work in their herbaria and Dr Richard K. Brummitt (K) for his helpful advice. The first author expresses her gratitude to the Marie Curie Foundation for supporting this project. The authors also thank the reviewers for very helpful comments.

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Copyright information

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Botanic Gardens, KewRichmondU.K.
  2. 2.Botanical Museum, Finnish Museum of Natural HistoryUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland

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