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Kew Bulletin

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 143–149 | Cite as

A reappraisal of Barnebydendron (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae: Detarieae)

  • M. C. Warwick
  • G. P. Lewis
  • H. C. de Lima
Article

Summary

Barnebydendron J. H. Kirkbr. (LeguminosaeCaesalpinioideae – Detarieae), when first described under the name Phyllocarpus Riedel ex Tul. (1843), was considered to be a monospecific genus restricted to the Atlantic forest in the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A later collection from Guatemala in 1908 expanded the genus to two species. Many collections have been made since then in other parts of Central and South America and the distribution of the genus merits close examination. Recent publications have not provided full descriptions or illustrations, or cited specimens seen. A reappraisal of the genus is presented here and the monospecific status of the genus is confirmed.

Keywords

Atlantic forest Barnebydendron Colorallilo Guacamayo Leguminosae monospecific neotropics seasonally dry forest 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the curators of the herbaria at F, MO, NY and P for kindly loaning material for study and two anonymous reviewers for their input. This work was supported in part by National Science Foundation grant DEB-0316375.

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Copyright information

© The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Botanic Garden EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Royal Botanic Gardens, KewRichmondUK
  3. 3.Instituto de Pesquisas, Jardim Botânico do Rio de JaneiroRio de JaneiroBrazil

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