Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 229–234 | Cite as

E. coli outbreak in a neonate intensive care unit in a general hospital in Mexico City

  • Erika Margarita Carrillo-Casas
  • Zaydy Suástegui-Urquijo
  • Sara Arroyo-Escalante
  • Rosario Morales-Espinosa
  • David Moncada-Barrón
  • Lorena Hernández-Delgado
  • José Luis Méndez-Sánchez
  • Gabriela Delgado-Sapién
  • Armando Navarro-Ocaña
  • Ángel Manjarrez-Hernández
  • Juan Xicohtencatl-Cortes
  • Rigoberto Hernández-Castro
Article
  • 283 Downloads

Abstract

Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of this paper was to describe an outbreak of Escherichia coli among infants admitted to the NICU of the General Hospital “Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez” in May of 2008. The isolated E. coli strains were identified using standard biochemical methods. The susceptibilities of these strains were analysed by determining their minimal inhibitory concentrations. Following this, their molecular relationships to each other were assessed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis and corroborated by serology. Twelve E. coli strains were isolated from blood, urine, or indwelling catheter samples from five cases of preterm infants within a 3-day period. Patients were admitted to the NICU of the general hospital and, during the outbreak, developed sepsis caused by E. coli. For four of the patients, the average age was 23 days, while one patient was a 3-month-old infant. Prior to sepsis, the infants had received assisted ventilation and hyperalimentation through a central venous catheter. Two profiles were observed by PFGE; profile A was identified as the outbreak’s cause and an outcome of cross-infection, while profile B showed genetic differences but serologically it was identified as part of the same serotype. We conclude that E. coli colonised the patients through horizontal transmission. A focal source of the microorganism in this outbreak was not identified, but cross-transmission through handling was the most probable route.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by grant CONACyT-87586 and CONACYT-100343 from the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia.

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Copyright information

© Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erika Margarita Carrillo-Casas
    • 1
  • Zaydy Suástegui-Urquijo
    • 2
  • Sara Arroyo-Escalante
    • 3
  • Rosario Morales-Espinosa
    • 4
  • David Moncada-Barrón
    • 3
  • Lorena Hernández-Delgado
    • 5
  • José Luis Méndez-Sánchez
    • 4
  • Gabriela Delgado-Sapién
    • 4
  • Armando Navarro-Ocaña
    • 6
  • Ángel Manjarrez-Hernández
    • 6
  • Juan Xicohtencatl-Cortes
    • 7
  • Rigoberto Hernández-Castro
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Biología Molecular e HistocompatibilidadHospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”MexicoMexico
  2. 2.Departamento de Ecología de Agentes PatógenosHospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”MéxicoMexico
  3. 3.Departamento de Laboratorio ClínicoHospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”MexicoMexico
  4. 4.Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de MedicinaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxicoMexico
  5. 5.Servicio de PediatríaHospital General “Dr. Manuel Gea González”MexicoMexico
  6. 6.Departamento de Salud Pública, Facultad de MedicinaUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMexicoMexico
  7. 7.Laboratorio de Bacteriología IntestinalHospital Infantil de México “Federico Gómez”MexicoMexico

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