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Folia Microbiologica

, 54:419 | Cite as

16S rRNA gene-based identification of cultured bacterial flora from host-seeking Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor reticulatus and Haemaphysalis concinna ticks, vectors of vertebrate pathogens

  • I. RudolfEmail author
  • J. Mendel
  • S. Šikutová
  • P. Švec
  • J. Masaříková
  • D. Nováková
  • L. Buňková
  • I. Sedláček
  • Z. Hubálek
Article

Abstract

A total of 151 bacterial isolates were recovered from different developmental stages (larvae, nymphs and adults) of field-collected ticks (67 strains from Ixodes ricinus, 38 from Dermacentor reticulatus, 46 from Haemaphysalis concinna). Microorganisms were identified by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Almost 87 % of the strains belonged to G+ bacteria with predominantly occurring genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. Other G+ strains included Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Frigoribacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Plantibacter, Rhodococcus, Rothia, and Staphylococcus. G strains occurred less frequently, comprising genera Advenella, Pseudomonas, Rahnella, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthomonas. Several strains of medical importance were found, namely Advenella incenata, Corynebacterium aurimucosum, Microbacterium oxydans, M. schleiferi, Staphylococcus spp., and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Data on cultivable microbial diversity in Eurasian tick species D. reticulatus and H. concinna are given, along with the extension of present knowledge concerning bacterial flora of I. ricinus.

Keywords

Tick Species Genus Bacillus Babesia Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia Ixodid Tick 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

D.r.

Dermacentor reticulatus

H.c.

Haemaphysalis concinna

I.r.

Ixodes ricinus

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Copyright information

© Institute of Microbiology, v.v.i, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Rudolf
    • 1
    • 5
    Email author
  • J. Mendel
    • 1
  • S. Šikutová
    • 1
  • P. Švec
    • 2
  • J. Masaříková
    • 3
  • D. Nováková
    • 2
  • L. Buňková
    • 4
  • I. Sedláček
    • 2
  • Z. Hubálek
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Vertebrate Biology, v.v.i.Academy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicBrnoCzech Republic
  2. 2.Czech Collection of Microorganisms, Institute of Experimental Biology, Faculty of ScienceMasaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic
  3. 3.Institute of Experimental Biology, Faculty of ScienceMasaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic
  4. 4.Faculty of TechnologyTomáš Baťa UniversityZlínCzech Republic
  5. 5.Medical Zoology Laboratory, Institute of Vertebrate Biology, v.v.i.Academy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicValticeCzech Republic

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