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Psychological Injury and Law

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 219–223 | Cite as

Psychological Injury and Law: A Biopsychosocial and Forensic Perspective

  • Gerald YoungEmail author
Article

Abstract

The articles in the present special issue on the area of psychological injury and law broaden understanding of the area by considering topics outside the range of the seven major areas that mark the field. In the articles in this special issue, common themes include: (a) having comprehensive, recent literature reviews, (b) presentation of models related to psychological injury and law in which existing models are integrated, (c) integration of biopsychological and forensic perspectives, and (d) consideration of development or change processes, and examination of causality. (e) All the articles discuss possible improvements to the DSM-IV; for example, there should be a separate, sixth axis pertaining to causality.

Keywords

Psychological injury Law Biopsychosocial Forensic Special issue 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Many thanks to a reviewer for helpful comments on the text. The author’s work has been supported by course leaves granted by both Glendon College and York University, and editorial grants from Springer Science + Business Media.

In terms of possible conflicts of interest, the author has obtained most of his attorney referrals and psycholegal referrals from plaintiff rather than defense attorneys and assessment companies.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Glendon CollegeYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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