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Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology

, Volume 32, Issue 11, pp 5293–5303 | Cite as

Numerical investigations of the cone-shaped vortex finders on the performance of cyclone separators

  • Vikash Kumar
  • Kailash Jha
Article
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

Performance analysis of 0.29 m diameter cyclone separator was done for cone shaped vortex finders having different in-built tapered angles varying from 0.0°-10.0° in steps of 2.5° at different inlet velocities using Fluent 15.0. Increasing the angle from 0.0° to 10.0° at the lowest inlet velocity decreases the Stokes number (Stk50), which represents the cut-size of a cyclone separator, by 22.1 % at an expense of significant increase in Euler number (Eu), representing the dimensionless pressure drop, by nearly 46.3 %, whereas at the highest inlet velocity of 25 m/s, the Stk50 decreases by 26.1 % and the increase in Eu lowers to 34.3 %. Beyond a critical angle of orientation, 5.0°, a recirculation zone of increasing magnitude develops inside the vortex finder. The axial velocity, tangential velocity, and pressure drop across the cyclone have been validated against published literature; a grid independence test was also done successfully.

Keywords

Conical vortex finders Cyclone separators Reynolds stress model (RSM) Recirculation zone Discrete phase modeling 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIIT (ISM)DhanbadIndia

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