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Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology

, Volume 30, Issue 9, pp 3985–3991 | Cite as

Analysis of high-speed train flow structures under crosswind

  • Terence Avadiar
  • James Bell
  • David Burton
  • Heman Cormaty
  • Chao Li
Article

Abstract

The flow structures along the length of a High-Speed Train (HST) are experimentally investigated under simulated crosswind conditions. The experiment uses flow visualizations and velocity measurements in a wind tunnel on a HST model at various angles of yaw. Surface visualizations shows the development of a longitudinal vortex, originating at the nose which travels along the leeward side of the train. A hypothesis is presented and tested proposing flow structures may repeat when the Boundary layer (BL) on the roof of the HST reaches maximum development or is “pushed off”. A key motivation is to evaluate the validity of using shortened HST models in a wind tunnel to correctly represent full-length trains. Using this theory, a shortened train model appears unable to completely model full-scale HSTs at realistic yaw angles.

Keywords

Aerodynamics Boundary layer Crosswind Flow structures Flow visualization High-speed train Wind tunnel 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terence Avadiar
    • 1
  • James Bell
    • 1
  • David Burton
    • 1
  • Heman Cormaty
    • 1
  • Chao Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringMonash UniversityVictoriaAustralia

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