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Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology

, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 2011–2017 | Cite as

Characterization of carbonaceous particulate matter emitted from marine diesel engine

  • Jae-Hyuk Choi
  • Ik-soon Cho
  • Jang Se Lee
  • Sang-Kyun Park
  • Won-Ju Lee
  • Hwajin Kim
  • Hye Jung Chang
  • Jin Young Kim
  • Seongcheol Jeong
  • Seul-Hyun Park
Article

Abstract

In an effort to aid the Korean ship-building industry to effectively respond to the upcoming environmental regulations, a series of experimental campaigns to characterize carbonaceous Particulate matters (PMs) emitted from a cruising marine ship have been carried out. To this end, the carbonaceous PMs emitted from two-stroke marine-diesel engines burning Bunker B (Low residual fuel oil, LRFO 3%) were sampled on-board at various locations: 1) After the turbo charger (TC), 2) before the economizer (ECO), 3) after the economizer, and 4) in the funnel of the chimney. Sampled carbonaceous PM particles were then analyzed using a High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained from the analysis of HRTEM images and Raman spectra indicate that carbonaceous PMs are mainly fractionated into Black carbon (BC) and Organic carbon (OC), respectively and the each fraction of sampled carbonaceous PMs varies with engine operation conditions and exhaust gas temperatures at the sampling location. The present work is anticipated to provide a useful set of information for characterizing carbonaceous PMs emitted from marine diesel engines.

Keywords

Black carbon (BC) Marine ship Organic carbon (OC) Particulate matter (PM) High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) Raman spectroscopy 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jae-Hyuk Choi
    • 1
  • Ik-soon Cho
    • 2
  • Jang Se Lee
    • 3
  • Sang-Kyun Park
    • 4
  • Won-Ju Lee
    • 5
  • Hwajin Kim
    • 6
  • Hye Jung Chang
    • 6
  • Jin Young Kim
    • 6
  • Seongcheol Jeong
    • 6
  • Seul-Hyun Park
    • 7
  1. 1.Division of Marine System EngineeringKorea Maritime and Ocean UniversityBusanKorea
  2. 2.Department of Ship OperationKorea Maritime and Ocean UniversityBusanKorea
  3. 3.Division of Information TechnologyKorea Maritime and Ocean UniversityBusanKorea
  4. 4.Division of Marine Information TechnologyKorea Maritime and Ocean UniversityBusanKorea
  5. 5.Korea Institute of Maritime and Fisheries TechnologyBusanKorea
  6. 6.Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST)SeoulKorea
  7. 7.Department of Mechanical Systems EngineeringChosun UniversityGwangjuKorea

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