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Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology

, Volume 26, Issue 11, pp 3605–3616 | Cite as

Analysis and prediction of tool wear, surface roughness and cutting forces in hard turning with CBN tool

  • Samir Khamel
  • Nouredine Ouelaa
  • Khaider Bouacha
Article

Abstract

The main of the present study is to investigate the effects of process parameters (cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut) on performance characteristics (tool life, surface roughness and cutting forces) in finish hard turning of AISI 52100 bearing steel with CBN tool. The cutting forces and surface roughness are measured at the end of useful tool life. The combined effects of the process parameters on performance characteristics are investigated using ANOVA. The composite desirability optimization technique associated with the RSM quadratic models is used as multi-objective optimization approach. The results show that feed rate and cutting speed strongly influence surface roughness and tool life. However, the depth of cut exhibits maximum influence on cutting forces. The proposed experimental and statistical approaches bring reliable methodologies to model, to optimize and to improve the hard turning process. They can be extended efficiently to study other machining processes.

Keywords

ANOVA CBN tool Hard turning RSM 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samir Khamel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nouredine Ouelaa
    • 2
  • Khaider Bouacha
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Industrial MaintenanceMohamed Chérif Messaadia UniversitySouk AhrasAlgeria
  2. 2.Laboratory of Mechanics and Structures (LMS)8 May 1945 UniversityGuelmaAlgeria

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