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Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 42–48 | Cite as

Comparison between whole-body inhalation and nose-only inhalation on the deposition and health effects of nanoparticles

  • Takako OyabuEmail author
  • Yasuo Morimoto
  • Hiroto Izumi
  • Yukiko Yoshiura
  • Taisuke Tomonaga
  • Byeong-Woo Lee
  • Takami Okada
  • Toshihiko Myojo
  • Manabu Shimada
  • Masaru Kubo
  • Kazuhiro Yamamoto
  • Kenji Kawaguchi
  • Takeshi Sasaki
Short Communication

Abstract

Objectives

We performed the two inhalation exposures, whole-body inhalation and nose-only inhalation, to investigate the pulmonary deposition and health effects of the two inhalation methods.

Methods

In both methods, we exposed rats to the same TiO2 nanoparticles at almost the same exposure concentration for 6 h and compared the deposited amounts of nanoparticles and histopathological changes in the lungs. Rats were exposed to rutile-type TiO2 nanoparticles generated by the spray-dry method for 6 h. The exposure concentration in the whole-body chamber was 4.10 ± 1.07 mg/m3, and that in nose-only chamber was 4.01 ± 1.11 mg/m3. The particle sizes were 230 and 180 nm, respectively. A control group was exposed to fresh air.

Results

The amounts of TiO2 deposited in the lungs as measured by ICP-AES after acid digestion just after the exposure were: 42.6 ± 3.5 μg in the whole-body exposure and 46.0 ± 7.7 μg in the nose-only exposure groups. The histopathological evaluation was the same in both exposure groups: no infiltration of inflammatory cells in the alveolar space and interstitium, and no fibrosis.

Conclusion

The two inhalation methods using the same material under the same exposure conditions resulted in the same particle deposition and histopathology in the lung.

Keywords

Whole-body inhalation Nose-only inhalation TiO2 nanoparticle Deposition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is part of the research program of “Development of innovative methodology for safety assessment of industrial nanomaterials” supported by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

We have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Hygiene 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takako Oyabu
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Yasuo Morimoto
    • 1
  • Hiroto Izumi
    • 1
  • Yukiko Yoshiura
    • 1
  • Taisuke Tomonaga
    • 1
  • Byeong-Woo Lee
    • 1
  • Takami Okada
    • 1
  • Toshihiko Myojo
    • 1
  • Manabu Shimada
    • 2
  • Masaru Kubo
    • 2
  • Kazuhiro Yamamoto
    • 3
  • Kenji Kawaguchi
    • 3
  • Takeshi Sasaki
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Occupational and Environmental Health, JapanKitakyushuJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of EngineeringHiroshima UniversityHigashi-HiroshimaJapan
  3. 3.National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and TechnologyTsukubaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Institute of Industrial Ecological SciencesUniversity of Occupational and Environmental Health, JapanKitakyushuJapan

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