Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 333–343

Perception of anesthesia safety and postoperative symptoms of surgery patients in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: a pioneering trial of postoperative care assessment in a developing nation

  • Kumiko Soejima
  • Aya Goto
  • Phan Ton Ngoc Vu
  • Le Huu Thien Bien
  • Nguyen Quang Vinh
  • Pham Nghiem Minh
  • Gautam A. Deshpande
  • Seiji Yasumura
  • Akira Fukao
Regular Article

Abstract

Objectives

Vietnamese patients’ views on healthcare are changing as surgical interventions become more commonplace, but their views on perioperative care have remained largely unstudied during this period of rapid change. This study assesses Vietnamese patients’ impression of anesthesia safety and postoperative pain in relation to clinical outcomes with the aim of improving patient-centered perioperative care.

Methods

The study cohort consisted of 180 hospitalized patients who were followed for 24 h following abdominal surgery. The assessments of these patients on the use of anesthesia and postoperative pain were measured by means of a 5-point Likert scale survey. Perioperative events were recorded on standardized forms by medical staff. The relationship between relevant factors affecting the patients’ perceptions of anesthesia safety, postoperative symptoms, and pain was examined using multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results

The perception of a low level of anesthesia safety by 105 patients (59%) was associated with a low satisfaction in terms of preoperative anesthesia education [odds ratio (OR) 15.03], poor interaction with family (OR 21.80), and absence of perioperative adverse effects (OR 6.10). The occurrence of three or more postoperative symptoms (59%) was associated with a surgery ≥3 h (OR 2.00). Severe pain at 2 h (25%) post-surgery was associated with male gender (OR 2.08) and open surgery (OR 3.30), no reduction in pain at 24 h (51%) was associated with female gender (OR 2.08), and experiencing as much or more pain than expected (46%) was associated with blood loss ≥100 ml (OR 1.04) and low satisfaction with staff communication (OR 1.90).

Conclusion

Our results suggest that facilitating patients’ communication with staff and families and paying attention to gender differences in pain management are important factors to take into consideration when the aim is to improve perioperative care in the rapidly developing healthcare environment of Vietnam.

Keywords

Anesthesia safety Patient satisfaction Postoperative pain 

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Hygiene 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kumiko Soejima
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Aya Goto
    • 2
  • Phan Ton Ngoc Vu
    • 4
  • Le Huu Thien Bien
    • 5
  • Nguyen Quang Vinh
    • 6
  • Pham Nghiem Minh
    • 7
  • Gautam A. Deshpande
    • 3
  • Seiji Yasumura
    • 2
  • Akira Fukao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Public Health, Faculty of MedicineYamagata UniversityYamagataJapan
  2. 2.Department of Public Health, School of MedicineFukushima Medical UniversityFukushimaJapan
  3. 3.Center for Clinical Epidemiology, St. Luke’s Life Science InstituteSt. Luke’s International HospitalChuo-ku, TokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of AnesthesiaUniversity Medical CenterHo Chi Minh CityVietnam
  5. 5.Department of ICUUniversity Medical CenterHo Chi Minh CityVietnam
  6. 6.Hanh Phuc Women and Children Hospital ProjectHanh Phuc Women and Children HospitalHo Chi Minh CityVietnam
  7. 7.Department of GeneticsTu Du Obstetrical and Gynecological HospitalHo Chi Minh CityVietnam

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