Journal of Transportation Security

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 41–55 | Cite as

Ambush avoidance in vehicle routing for valuable delivery

  • Matteo Salani
  • Gaëtan Duyckaerts
  • Peter Goodings Swartz
Article

Abstract

Optimal route planning under threat of ambush is essential for any vehicle carrying valuable persons or objects. Our paper proposes a planning method for such a vehicle in an urban environment where, starting from a depot, a set of predetermined destinations must be served. We develop a previously existent flow-based single-destination model, proposing a method for minimizing attacker payoff in the multi-destination case. Our method requires specification of destination ordering, and we propose a method for mixing of these possible orders. Such mixing further reduces attacker payoff. We then apply the method to a set of possible scenarios based on Cambridge, Massachusetts, and analyze the benefits of our mixed ordering strategy. Finally, we introduce a second-level optimization model which again reduces the overall risk of successful ambush.

Keywords

Ambush avoidance Vehicle routing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matteo Salani
    • 1
  • Gaëtan Duyckaerts
    • 1
  • Peter Goodings Swartz
    • 1
  1. 1.ENACEcole Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

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