Cell Stress and Chaperones

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 29–39 | Cite as

Eleven days of moderate exercise and heat exposure induces acclimation without significant HSP70 and apoptosis responses of lymphocytes in college-aged males

  • Lindsay L. Hom
  • Elaine Choung-Hee Lee
  • Jenna M. Apicella
  • Sean D. Wallace
  • Holly Emmanuel
  • Jennifer F. Klau
  • Paula Y. S. Poh
  • Stefania Marzano
  • Lawrence E. Armstrong
  • Douglas J. Casa
  • Carl M. Maresh
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess whether a lymphocyte heat shock response and altered heat tolerance to ex vivo heat shock is evident during acclimation. We aimed to use flow cytometry to assess the CD3+CD4+ T lymphocyte cell subset. We further aimed to induce acclimation using moderately stressful daily exercise-heat exposures to achieve acclimation. Eleven healthy males underwent 11 days of heat acclimation. Subjects walked for 90 min (50 ± 8% VO2max) on a treadmill (3.5 mph, 5% grade), in an environmental chamber (33°C, 30–50% relative humidity). Rectal temperature (°C), heart rate (in beats per minute), rating of perceived exertion , thermal ratings, hydration state, and sweat rate were measured during exercise and recovery. On days 1, 4, 7, 10, and 11, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from pre- and post-exercise blood samples. Intracellular and surface HSP70 (SPA-820PE, Stressgen, Assay Designs), and annexin V (ab14085, Abcam Inc.), as a marker of early apoptosis, were measured on CD3+ and CD4+ (sc-70624, sc-70670, Santa Cruz Biotechnology) gated lymphocytes. On day 10, subjects experienced 28 h of sleep loss. Heat acclimation was verified with decreased post-exercise rectal temperature, heart rate, and increased sweat rate on day 11, versus day 1. Heat acclimation was achieved in the absence of significant changes in intracellular HSP70 mean fluorescence intensity and percent of HSP70+ lymphocytes during acclimation. Furthermore, there was no increased cellular heat tolerance during secondary ex vivo heat shock of the lymphocytes acquired from subjects during acclimation. There was no effect of a mild sleep loss on any variable. We conclude that our protocol successfully induced physiological acclimation without induction of cellular heat shock responses in lymphocytes and that added mild sleep loss is not sufficient to induce a heat shock response.

Keywords

Exercise-heat stress Heat acclimation Heat shock protein Apoptosis Cytoprotection Sleep deprivation 

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Copyright information

© Cell Stress Society International 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lindsay L. Hom
    • 1
  • Elaine Choung-Hee Lee
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jenna M. Apicella
    • 1
  • Sean D. Wallace
    • 1
  • Holly Emmanuel
    • 1
  • Jennifer F. Klau
    • 1
  • Paula Y. S. Poh
    • 1
  • Stefania Marzano
    • 1
  • Lawrence E. Armstrong
    • 1
  • Douglas J. Casa
    • 1
  • Carl M. Maresh
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Performance Laboratory, Department of KinesiologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Mount Desert Island Biological LaboratorySalisbury CoveUSA
  3. 3.Salisbury CoveUSA

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