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Recurrent intragenic exon rearrangements of SOBP and AUTS2 in non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma

  • Yosuke MatsumotoEmail author
  • Yoshiaki Chinen
  • Yuji Shimura
  • Hisao Nagoshi
  • Nana Sasaki
  • Ayako Muramatsu
  • Kodai Kuriyama
  • Muneo Ohshiro
  • Yoshiko Hirakawa
  • Toshiki Iwai
  • Hitoji Uchiyama
  • Tomohiko Taki
  • Shigeo Horiike
  • Junya Kuroda
  • Masafumi Taniwaki
Original Article
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Expression of intragenic exon rearrangements (IERs) has reportedly been detected in both normal and cancer cells. However, there have been few reports of occurrence of these rearrangements specific to neoplasms including malignant lymphoma. In this study, we detected IERs of ten genes (NBPF8, SOBP, AUTS2, RAB21, SPATA13, ABCC4, WDR7, PHLPP1, NFATC1 and MAGED1) in non-Hodgkin B cell lymphoma (B-NHL) cell line KPUM-UH1 using a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using reversely directed divergent primers within exons involved in genomic intragenic gains followed by sequencing analysis. Among them, the IERs involved in SOBP (6q21) exon 2 and 3 and AUTS2 (7q11.22) exon 2–4 were the molecular lesions specific to tumors and were frequently detected in B-NHL samples. These IERs constitute novel genetic alterations of B-NHL, which might be associated with tumorigenesis and be useful as genetic biological markers.

Keywords

Intragenic exon rearrangement SOBP AUTS2 Lymphoma 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

12185_2019_2766_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (903 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1: Sequencing analyses of eight genes with the IERs of KPUM-UH1. The IERs of NBPF8, ABCC4 and NFATC1 were in-frame. Supplementary Table 1: Cell lines and primary samples of various tumors analyzed in this study. Supplementary Table 2: Fifty-four genes with intragenic gains of the genomic DNA identified by means of high-density SNP genotyping arrays in KPUM-UH1. The amplified exons or introns are shown in parentheses. Ten genes shown in bold type were confirmed to have IERs by RT-PCR and subsequent sequencing analyses. Supplementary Table 3: The ten genes with the IERs detected in KPUM-UH1. Supplementary Table 4: The RDD primer sets of the ten genes with the IERs. Although RT-PCR was performed by using the RDD primer sets for 54 genes listed in Supplementary Table 2, the list of the primer sets of 44 genes are omitted. Supplementary Table 5: Primer sets for detection of the IERs of SOBP and AUTS2. The locations of these primers in SOBP and AUTS2 are shown in Figs. 3 and 4, respectively

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Hematology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yosuke Matsumoto
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yoshiaki Chinen
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yuji Shimura
    • 3
  • Hisao Nagoshi
    • 4
  • Nana Sasaki
    • 5
  • Ayako Muramatsu
    • 1
  • Kodai Kuriyama
    • 1
  • Muneo Ohshiro
    • 1
  • Yoshiko Hirakawa
    • 1
  • Toshiki Iwai
    • 1
  • Hitoji Uchiyama
    • 1
  • Tomohiko Taki
    • 6
    • 7
  • Shigeo Horiike
    • 3
  • Junya Kuroda
    • 3
  • Masafumi Taniwaki
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of HematologyJapanese Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi HospitalKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of HematologyFukuchiyama City HospitalFukuchiyamaJapan
  3. 3.Division of Hematology and OncologyKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Hematology and OncologyHiroshima UniversityHiroshimaJapan
  5. 5.Department of HematologyJapanese Red Cross Kyoto Daini HospitalKyotoJapan
  6. 6.Department of Medical TechnologyKyorin University, Faculty of Health ScienceTokyoJapan
  7. 7.Center for Molecular Diagnostics and TherapeuticsKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan

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