Advertisement

International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 108, Issue 6, pp 658–664 | Cite as

Invasive Scopulariopsis alboflavescens infection in patient with acute myeloid leukemia

  • Keiji Kurata
  • Sho Nishimura
  • Hiroya Ichikawa
  • Rina Sakai
  • Yu Mizutani
  • Kei Takenaka
  • Seiji Kakiuchi
  • Yoshiharu Miyata
  • Akihito Kitao
  • Kimikazu Yakushijin
  • Shinichiro Kawamoto
  • Katsuya Yamamoto
  • Mitsuhiro Ito
  • Hiroshi Matsuoka
  • Issei Tokimatsu
  • Katsuhiko Kamei
  • Hironobu Minami
Case Report
  • 74 Downloads

Abstract

Scopulariopsis alboflavescens is a soil saprophyte that is widely distributed in nature. Recently, there have been increasing number of reports of invasive infections with Scopulariopsis species in immunocompromised patients. In this report, we described an adult woman with acute myeloid leukemia and who developed S. alboflavescens pneumonia. Liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole combination therapy was unsuccessful and the patient died because of pneumonia. Scopulariopsis is highly resistant to available antifungal agents and almost invariably fatal. This case report should alert clinicians to the importance of listing Scopulariopsis as a pathogenic fungus in immunocompromised patients.

Keywords

Scopulariopsis Acute myeloid leukemia Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Tosti A, Piraccini BM, Stinchi C, Lorenzi S. Onychomycosis due to Scopulariopsis brevicaulis: clinical features and response to systemic antifungals. Br J Dermatol. 1996;135:799–802.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tosti A, Piraccini BM, Lorenzi S. Onychomycosis caused by nondermatophytic molds: clinical features and response to treatment of 59 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000;42:217–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Iwen PC, Schutte SD, Florescu DF, Noel-Hurst RK, Sigler L. Invasive Scopulariopsis brevicaulis infection in an immunocompromised patient and review of prior cases caused by Scopulariopsis and Microascus species. Med Mycol. 2012;50:561–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Rossier C, Hoang-Van K, Turian G. Secretion of an Mr 60000 protein by benomyl-treated cells of Neurospora crassa. Eur J Cell Biol. 1989;50:333–9.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lai CC, Tan CK, Huang YT, Shao PL, Hsueh PR. Current challenges in the management of invasive fungal infections. J Infect Chemother. 2008;14:77–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Walsh TJ, Groll A, Hiemenz J, Fleming R, Roilides E, Anaissie E. Infections due to emerging and uncommon medically important fungal pathogens. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2004;10(Suppl 1):48–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Li XL, Ojaghian MR, Zhang JZ, Zhu SJ. A new species of Scopulariopsis and its synergistic effect on pathogenicity of Verticillium dahliae on cotton plants. Microbiol Res. 2017;201:12–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Yang Q, Wei J, Chen Z. Fatal bronchial invasion of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in an acute monocytic leukemia patient. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012;73:369–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Petit A, Levine E, Epaud R, Le Pointe HD, Angoulvant A. Scopulariopsis brevicaulis abscess in a child treated for myeloblastic leukaemia. Lancet Infect Dis. 2011;11:416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kriesel JD, Adderson EE, Gooch WM III, Pavia AT. Invasive sinonasal disease due to Scopulariopsis candida: case report and review of scopulariopsosis. Clin Infect Dis. 1994;19:317–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Pate MJ, Hemmige V, Woc-Colburn L, Restrepo A. Successful eradication of invasive Scopulariopsis brumptii in a liver transplant recipient. Transpl Infect Dis. 2016;18:275–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Neglia JP, Hurd DD, Ferrieri P, Snover DC. Invasive Scopulariopsis in the immunocompromised host. Am J Med. 1987;83:1163–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Krisher KK, Holdridge NB, Mustafa MM, Rinaldi MG, McGough DA. Disseminated Microascus cirrosus infection in pediatric bone marrow transplant recipient. J Clin Microbiol. 1995;33:735–7.PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Ellison MD, Hung RT, Harris K, Campbell BH. Report of the first case of invasive fungal sinusitis caused by Scopulariopsis acremonium: review of scopulariopsis infections. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1998;124:1014–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Swick BL, Reddy SC, Friedrichs A, Stone MS. Disseminated Scopulariopsis-culture is required to distinguish from other disseminated mould infections. J Cutan Pathol. 2010;37:687–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Steinbach WJ, Schell WA, Miller JL, Perfect JR, Martin PL. Fatal Scopulariopsis brevicaulis infection in a paediatric stem-cell transplant patient treated with voriconazole and caspofungin and a review of Scopulariopsis infections in immunocompromised patients. J Infect. 2004;48:112–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Ustun C, Huls G, Stewart M, Marr KA. Resistant Microascus cirrosus pneumonia can be treated with a combination of surgery, multiple anti-fungal agents and a growth factor. Mycopathologia. 2006;162:299–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Beltrame A, Sarmati L, Cudillo L, Cerretti R, Picardi A, Anemona L, et al. A fatal case of invasive fungal sinusitis by Scopulariopsis acremonium in a bone marrow transplant recipient. Int J Infect Dis. 2009;13:e488-92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Salmon A, Debourgogne A, Vasbien M, Clement L, Collomb J, Plenat F, et al. Disseminated Scopulariopsis brevicaulis infection in an allogeneic stem cell recipient: case report and review of the literature. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010;16:508–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Szental JA, Kam JK, Yohendran J, Morrissey O, Hall AJ. Presumed Scopulariopsis brevicaulis chorioretinitis in a stem cell transplant recipient. Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2010;38:314–5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Gavril D, Woerther PL, Ben Lakhdar A, Mahjoubi L, Routier E, Chachaty E, et al. Invasive cutaneous infection due to Scopulariopsis brevicaulis unsuccessfully treated with high-dose micafungin in a neutropenic patient. Infection. 2017;45:361–3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Jain D, Oberoi JK, Shahi SK, Shivnani G, Wattal C. Scopulariopsis brevicaulis infection of prosthetic valve resembling aspergilloma on histopathology. Cardiovasc Pathol. 2011;20:381–3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Odabasi Z, Paetznick VL, Rodriguez JR, Chen E, McGinnis MR, Ostrosky-Zeichner L. Differences in beta-glucan levels in culture supernatants of a variety of fungi. Med Mycol. 2006;44:267–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Sandoval-Denis M, Sutton DA, Fothergill AW, Cano-Lira J, Gene J, Decock CA, et al. Scopulariopsis, a poorly known opportunistic fungus: spectrum of species in clinical samples and in vitro responses to antifungal drugs. J Clin Microbiol. 2013;51:3937–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Cuenca-Estrella M, Gomez-Lopez A, Buitrago MJ, Mellado E, Garcia-Effron G, Rodriguez-Tudela JL. In vitro activities of 10 combinations of antifungal agents against the multiresistant pathogen Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2006;50:2248–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Yao L, Wan Z, Li R, Yu J. In vitro triple combination of antifungal drugs against clinical Scopulariopsis and Microascus species. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2015;59:5040–3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Martin-Vicente A, Guarro J, Capilla J. Does a triple combination have better activity than double combinations against multiresistant fungi? Experimental in vitro evaluation. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2017;49:422–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Woudenberg JHC, Meijer M, Houbraken J, Samson RA. Scopulariopsis and scopulariopsis-like species from indoor environments. Stud Mycol. 2017;88:1–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keiji Kurata
    • 1
  • Sho Nishimura
    • 2
  • Hiroya Ichikawa
    • 1
  • Rina Sakai
    • 1
  • Yu Mizutani
    • 1
  • Kei Takenaka
    • 1
  • Seiji Kakiuchi
    • 1
  • Yoshiharu Miyata
    • 1
  • Akihito Kitao
    • 1
  • Kimikazu Yakushijin
    • 1
  • Shinichiro Kawamoto
    • 3
  • Katsuya Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Mitsuhiro Ito
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Matsuoka
    • 1
  • Issei Tokimatsu
    • 4
  • Katsuhiko Kamei
    • 5
  • Hironobu Minami
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology and HematologyKobe University HospitalKobeJapan
  2. 2.Division of Infectious DiseasesKobe University HospitalKobeJapan
  3. 3.Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell TherapyKobe University HospitalKobeJapan
  4. 4.Department of Infection Control and PreventionKobe University HospitalKobeJapan
  5. 5.Medical Mycology Research CenterChiba UniversityChibaJapan

Personalised recommendations