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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 93, Issue 5, pp 652–659 | Cite as

The role of donor characteristics and post-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor white blood cell counts in predicting the adverse events and yields of stem cell mobilization

  • Shu-Huey Chen
  • Shang-Hsien Yang
  • Sung-Chao Chu
  • Yu-Chieh Su
  • Chu-Yu Chang
  • Ya-Wen Chiu
  • Ruey-Ho Kao
  • Dian-Kun Li
  • Kuo-Liang Yang
  • Tso-Fu Wang
Original Article

Abstract

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is now widely used for stem cell mobilization. We evaluated the role of post-G-CSF white blood cell (WBC) counts and donor factors in predicting adverse events and yields associated with mobilization. WBC counts were determined at baseline, after the third and the fifth dose of G-CSF in 476 healthy donors. Donors with WBC ≥ 50 × 103/μL post the third dose of G-CSF experienced more fatigue, myalgia/arthralgia, and chills, but final post-G-CSF CD34+ cell counts were similar. Although the final CD34+ cell count was higher in donors with WBC ≥ 50 × 103/μL post the fifth G-CSF, the incidence of side effects was similar. Females more frequently experienced headache, nausea/anorexia, vomiting, fever, and lower final CD34+ cell count than did males. Donors with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 showed higher incidences of sweat and insomnia as well as higher final CD34+ cell counts. Donor receiving G-CSF ≥ 10 μg/kg tended to experience bone pain, headache and chills more frequently. Multivariate analysis indicated that female gender is an independent factor predictive of the occurrence of most side effects, except for ECOG > 1 and chills. Higher BMI was also an independent predictor for fatigue, myalgia/arthralgia, and sweat. Higher G-CSF dose was associated with bone pain, while the WBC count post the third G-CSF was associated with fatigue only. In addition, one donor in the study period did not complete the mobilization due to suspected anaphylactoid reaction. Observation for 1 h after the first injection of G-CSF is required to prevent complications from unpredictable side effects.

Keywords

Hematopoietic stem cells Mobilization Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor White blood cell count Side effects 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

Supplementary material

12185_2011_844_MOESM1_ESM.doc (71 kb)
Supplementary table (DOC 71 kb)

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shu-Huey Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shang-Hsien Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sung-Chao Chu
    • 4
  • Yu-Chieh Su
    • 2
    • 5
  • Chu-Yu Chang
    • 3
  • Ya-Wen Chiu
    • 3
  • Ruey-Ho Kao
    • 2
    • 4
  • Dian-Kun Li
    • 2
    • 5
  • Kuo-Liang Yang
    • 3
  • Tso-Fu Wang
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsTzu-Chi General HospitalHualienTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, College of MedicineTzu-Chi UniversityHualienTaiwan
  3. 3.Buddhist Tzu-Chi Stem Cells CenterHualienTaiwan
  4. 4.Department of Hematology and OncologyTzu-Chi General HospitalHualienTaiwan
  5. 5.Department of Hematology and OncologyTzu-Chi General HospitalChiayiTaiwan

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