International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 91, Issue 2, pp 258–266

Rituximab in combination with CHOP chemotherapy for the treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma in Japan: a retrospective analysis of 1,057 cases from Kyushu Lymphoma Study Group

  • Ritsuko Seki
  • Koichi Ohshima
  • Koji Nagafuji
  • Tomoaki Fujisaki
  • Naokuni Uike
  • Fumio Kawano
  • Hisashi Gondo
  • Shigeyoshi Makino
  • Tetsuya Eto
  • Yukiyoshi Moriuchi
  • Fumihiro Taguchi
  • Tomohiko Kamimura
  • Hiroyuki Tsuda
  • Ryosuke Ogawa
  • Kazuya Shimoda
  • Kiyoshi Yamashita
  • Keiko Suzuki
  • Hitoshi Suzushima
  • Kunihiro Tsukazaki
  • Masakazu Higuchi
  • Atae Utsunomiya
  • Masahiro Iwahashi
  • Yutaka Imamura
  • Kazuo Tamura
  • Junji Suzumiya
  • Minoru Yoshida
  • Yasunobu Abe
  • Tadashi Matsumoto
  • Takashi Okamura
Original Article

Abstract

We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma treated with rituximab plus CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone) as a first-line therapy at 22 hospitals of the Kyushu Lymphoma Study Group. During the period 1996–2005, 1,057 patients (aged 22–90 years) were analyzed. Of these, 678 were treated with CHOP, and 379 were treated with rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP). The complete response rate was 59.9% in the CHOP group and 67.0% in the R-CHOP group (P < 0.001). Three-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were significantly higher in the R-CHOP group than in the CHOP group (61.3 vs. 45.6% for PFS, P < 0.001; 68.3 vs. 54.5% for OS, P < 0.001). The International Prognostic Index was a good prognostic marker for both groups; a survival benefit of rituximab addition was found for each risk subgroup and also for both age groups (≤60 and >60 years). Among 345 patients who received localized radiation therapy, the adding rituximab to CHOP attenuated the survival difference between CHOP and R-CHOP groups (P = 0.104), compared with no radiation group (P < 0.001). Results of this large-scale, multicenter study confirm that rituximab plus CHOP provided a greater survival benefit than CHOP alone.

Keywords

DLBCL Rituximab CHOP Radiation Prognosis 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ritsuko Seki
    • 1
    • 3
  • Koichi Ohshima
    • 2
    • 3
  • Koji Nagafuji
    • 1
  • Tomoaki Fujisaki
    • 4
  • Naokuni Uike
    • 5
  • Fumio Kawano
    • 6
  • Hisashi Gondo
    • 7
  • Shigeyoshi Makino
    • 8
  • Tetsuya Eto
    • 9
  • Yukiyoshi Moriuchi
    • 10
  • Fumihiro Taguchi
    • 11
  • Tomohiko Kamimura
    • 12
  • Hiroyuki Tsuda
    • 13
  • Ryosuke Ogawa
    • 14
  • Kazuya Shimoda
    • 15
  • Kiyoshi Yamashita
    • 15
  • Keiko Suzuki
    • 16
  • Hitoshi Suzushima
    • 17
  • Kunihiro Tsukazaki
    • 18
  • Masakazu Higuchi
    • 19
  • Atae Utsunomiya
    • 20
  • Masahiro Iwahashi
    • 21
  • Yutaka Imamura
    • 22
  • Kazuo Tamura
    • 23
  • Junji Suzumiya
    • 24
  • Minoru Yoshida
    • 25
  • Yasunobu Abe
    • 26
  • Tadashi Matsumoto
    • 27
  • Takashi Okamura
    • 1
    • 3
    • 28
  1. 1.Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of MedicineKurume University School of MedicineKurumeJapan
  2. 2.Department of PathologyKurume University School of MedicineKurumeJapan
  3. 3.Research Center for Innovative Cancer TherapyKurume UniversityKurumeJapan
  4. 4.Department of Internal MedicineMatsuyama Red Cross HospitalMatsuyamaJapan
  5. 5.Department of HematologyNational Kyushu Cancer CenterFukuokaJapan
  6. 6.Department of Internal MedicineNational Hospital Organization, Kumamoto Medical CenterKumamotoJapan
  7. 7.Department of Internal MedicineSaga Prefectural Hospital KoseikanSagaJapan
  8. 8.Department of Internal MedicineMiyazaki Prefectural HospitalMiyazakiJapan
  9. 9.Department of HematologyHamanomachi HospitalFukuokaJapan
  10. 10.Department of HematologySasebo City General HospitalSaseboJapan
  11. 11.Department of HematologyIizuka HospitalIizukaJapan
  12. 12.Department of HematologyHarasanshin General HospitalFukuokaJapan
  13. 13.Division of Clinical HematologyKumamoto City HospitalKumamotoJapan
  14. 14.Shimonoseki City Central HospitalShimonosekiJapan
  15. 15.Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hematology, Faculty of MedicineMiyazaki UniversityKiyotakeJapan
  16. 16.Department of Internal MedicineKoga General HospitalMiyazakiJapan
  17. 17.Department of Internal MedicineNTT Nishinippon Kyushu General HospitalKumamotoJapan
  18. 18.Molecular Medicine Unit and Hematology, Atomic Bomb Disease InstituteNagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesNagasakiJapan
  19. 19.Department of Internal MedicineKyushu Kosei-nenkin HospitalKitakyushuJapan
  20. 20.Department of HematologyImamura Bun-in HospitalKagoshimaJapan
  21. 21.Department of Internal MedicineSaiseikai-Hita HospitalHitaJapan
  22. 22.Department of HematologySt. Mary HospitalKurumeJapan
  23. 23.Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of MedicineFukuoka University HospitalFukuokaJapan
  24. 24.Department of Internal MedicineFukuoka University Chikushi HospitalFukuokaJapan
  25. 25.Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Health Care CenterKumamotoJapan
  26. 26.Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical ScienceKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  27. 27.Department of HematologyImamura Hon-in HospitalKagoshimaJapan
  28. 28.Division of Hematology, Department of MedicineKurume University School of MedicineKurume, FukuokaJapan

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