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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 88, Issue 2, pp 154–158 | Cite as

Clinical significance of minimal residual disease in patients with t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia in Japan

  • Hiroto NarimatsuEmail author
  • Masaki Iino
  • Takuji Ichihashi
  • Toshiya Yokozawa
  • Masaya Hayakawa
  • Hitoshi Kiyoi
  • Takaaki Takeo
  • Akiyo Sawamoto
  • Hiroatsu Iida
  • Motohiro Tsuzuki
  • Masamitsu Yanada
  • Tomoki Naoe
  • Ritsuro Suzuki
  • Isamu Sugiura
Original Article

Abstract

To examine the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease (MRD) in t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 96 bone marrow samples from 26 Japanese patients in complete remission (CR) were analyzed regarding the RUNX1/MTG8 transcript using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay. All patients were treated with intensive chemotherapy. The median copy number of the RUNX1/MTG8 transcript, measured after each treatment course decreased over time. However, an increase in the MRD level was documented in three patients after the second consolidation, and all of them subsequently relapsed. The relapse-free survival (RFS) did not differ between the patients whose MRD levels were below or above 1,000 copies/µg after the first consolidation, with respective 2-year rates of 62 and 86% (P = 0.21). With respect to the MRD level after induction therapy, our data also failed to show any favorable effect of a lower MRD on RFS. Although these findings need to be confirmed with a larger number of patients, our data indicate that the MRD level at a given time during the early course in CR does not predict the outcome in Japanese patients.

Keywords

Acute myeloid leukemia t(8;21) RUNX/MTG8 Minimal residual disease Prognosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to thank all the staff and resident members of the participating institutions. A complete list of participating institutions appears in the Appendix.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroto Narimatsu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Masaki Iino
    • 3
  • Takuji Ichihashi
    • 4
  • Toshiya Yokozawa
    • 5
  • Masaya Hayakawa
    • 6
  • Hitoshi Kiyoi
    • 7
  • Takaaki Takeo
    • 8
  • Akiyo Sawamoto
    • 1
  • Hiroatsu Iida
    • 9
  • Motohiro Tsuzuki
    • 10
  • Masamitsu Yanada
    • 2
  • Tomoki Naoe
    • 2
  • Ritsuro Suzuki
    • 11
  • Isamu Sugiura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Hematology and OncologyToyohashi Municipal HospitalToyohashiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Hematology and OncologyNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of HematologyYamanashi Prefectural Central HospitalKofuJapan
  4. 4.Department of HematologyOkazaki City HospitalOkazakiJapan
  5. 5.Department of Hematology/OncologyClinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Nagoya Medical CenterNagoyaJapan
  6. 6.Department of HematologyKomaki City HospitalKomakiJapan
  7. 7.Department of Infectious DiseasesNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  8. 8.Department of HematologyYokkaichi Municipal HospitalYokkaichiJapan
  9. 9.Department of HematologyMeitetsu HospitalNagoyaJapan
  10. 10.Department of Internal MedicineFujita Health University School of MedicineToyoakeJapan
  11. 11.Department of HSCT Data ManagementNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan

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