International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 87, Issue 2, pp 189–194

Tumor necrosis factor-α enhances DMSO-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells through the activation of ERK/MAPK pathway

  • Hong-Nu Yu
  • Young-Rae Lee
  • Eun-Mi Noh
  • Kyung-Sun Lee
  • Eun-Kyung Song
  • Myung-Kwan Han
  • Yong-Chul Lee
  • Chang-Yeol Yim
  • Jinny Park
  • Byeong-Soo Kim
  • Sung-Ho Lee
  • Seung Jin Lee
  • Jong-Suk Kim
Original Article

Abstract

The differentiation of promyelocytic leukemic cells into mature cells is the major strategy for drug-based treatment of leukemia. Higher efficient methods to differentiate promyelocytic leukemic cells have been developed using various differentiation inducers including interferon-α, interleukin-4, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a single agent or in combination with each other. Here, we show that a combination of TNF-α with DMSO shows a synergic effect on HL-60 cell differentiation through the activation of ERK pathway. TNF-α enhanced CD11b expression and percent of cell population in the G1 phase induced by DMSO, which are hallmarks for HL-60 cell differentiation. Inhibition of ERK pathway abolished the synergic effect of TNF-α in combination with DMSO on HL-60 differentiation, but the inhibition NF-κB pathway did not. These results suggest that TNF-α synergistically increases DMSO-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells through the activation of ERK/MAPK-signaling pathway.

Keywords

DMSO TNF-α MAPK NF-κB Leukemic cell differentiation 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong-Nu Yu
    • 1
  • Young-Rae Lee
    • 1
  • Eun-Mi Noh
    • 1
  • Kyung-Sun Lee
    • 1
  • Eun-Kyung Song
    • 2
  • Myung-Kwan Han
    • 2
  • Yong-Chul Lee
    • 3
  • Chang-Yeol Yim
    • 3
  • Jinny Park
    • 4
  • Byeong-Soo Kim
    • 5
  • Sung-Ho Lee
    • 5
  • Seung Jin Lee
    • 6
  • Jong-Suk Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Medical ScienceChonbuk National University Medical SchoolJeonjuSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyChonbuk National University Medical SchoolJeonjuSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Internal Medicine, Research Center for Allergic Immune DiseasesChonbuk National University Medical SchoolJeonjuSouth Korea
  4. 4.Division of Hematology/OncologyGachon University Medical CenterInchonSouth Korea
  5. 5.Department of Companion and Laboratory Animal ScienceKongju National UniversityKongjuSouth Korea
  6. 6.Department of Pharmacy, College of PharmacyEwha Womans UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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