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Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

  • Mark O. McConkey
  • Davide Edoardo Bonasia
  • Annunziato Amendola
Article

Abstract

An increasing number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are seen in children now than in the past due to increased sports participation. The natural history of ACL deficient knees in active individuals, particularly in children is poor. Surgical management of ACL deficiency in children is complex due to the potential risk of injury to the physis and growth disturbance. Delaying ACL reconstruction until maturity is possible but risks instability episodes and intra-articular damage. Surgical options include physeal-sparing, partial transphyseal and complete transphyseal procedures. This article reviews the management of ACL injured skeletally immature patients including the functional outcome and complications of contemporary surgical techniques.

Keywords

Pediatric ACL Anterior cruciate ligament Immature Prepubertal Child Skeletally immature Knee Physis Physeal sparing Transphyseal Epiphyseal Growth arrest Growth disturbance Over-the-top 

Notes

Disclosure

No conflicts of interest relevant to this article were reported.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark O. McConkey
    • 1
  • Davide Edoardo Bonasia
    • 2
  • Annunziato Amendola
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedics and RehabilitationUniversity of Iowa Hospitals and ClinicsIowa CityUSA
  2. 2.Ist Department of Orthopaedics, CTO hospitalUniversity of Turin Medical SchoolTorinoItaly
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedics and RehabilitationUI Sports Medicine CenterIowa CityUSA

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