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Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 916–921 | Cite as

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for the Monitoring of the Allium Derivative Propyl Propane Thiosulfonate Used as Natural Additive in Animal Feed

  • Paloma Abad
  • Francisco J. Lara
  • Natalia Arroyo-Manzanares
  • Alberto Baños
  • Enrique Guillamón
  • Ana M. García-Campaña
Article

Abstract

A new simple analytical method for monitoring propyl propane thiosulfonate (PTSO) in animal feed is presented. PTSO is an active ingredient from Allium spp. (like onion and shallot), proposed as a natural additive for feed being an efficient alternative to antibiotics used as growth promoter due to its efficiency improving animal health. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection has been used and a previous sample treatment based on solid-liquid extraction has been developed and optimized in order to extract PTSO from a feed for laying hens using acetone as extraction solvent. The method has been characterized obtaining limits of detection and quantification of 11.2 and 37.3 mg kg−1, respectively, which are lower than the concentrations expected in samples containing this additive. The intra- and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 8.3 % in all the cases, and recoveries varied from 90.2 to 94.6 %. Finally, in order to check the unequivocal identification of PTSO, mass spectrometry detection was applied. The proposed method is a simple procedure for monitoring PTSO in commercial feed, being possible to implement it in routine laboratories for quantification purposes and stability studies of the distributed products.

Keywords

Allium extract Propyl propane thiosulfonate Natural growth promoter Feed HPLC 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful for the financial support from the Campus of International Excellence – BioTic Granada (Project CEI2013-MP-27). NAM thanks the Junta the Andalucía for a postdoctoral contract.

Conflict of Interest

Paloma Abad declares that he has no conflict of interest. Francisco J. Lara declares that he has no conflict of interest. Natalia Arroyo-Manzanares declares that he has no conflict of interest. Alberto Baños declares that he has no conflict of interest. Enrique Guillamón declares that she has no conflict of interest. Ana M. García-Campaña declares that she has no conflict of interest. This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paloma Abad
    • 1
  • Francisco J. Lara
    • 2
  • Natalia Arroyo-Manzanares
    • 2
  • Alberto Baños
    • 1
  • Enrique Guillamón
    • 1
  • Ana M. García-Campaña
    • 2
  1. 1.DMC Research Center S.L.U.AlhendínSpain
  2. 2.Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of SciencesUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain

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