Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 129–135

Associations Between Socioeconomic Status and Catecholamine Levels Vary by Acculturation Status in Mexican-American Women

  • Jessica A. Jiménez
  • Smriti Shivpuri
  • Karla Espinosa de los Monteros
  • Karen A. Matthews
  • Paul J. Mills
  • Linda C. Gallo
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-012-9365-6

Cite this article as:
Jiménez, J.A., Shivpuri, S., de los Monteros, K.E. et al. ann. behav. med. (2012) 44: 129. doi:10.1007/s12160-012-9365-6

Abstract

Background

Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with poorer health, possibly through activation of the sympathetic nervous system.

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the association between SES and catecholamine levels, and variations by acculturation.

Methods

Three hundred one Mexican-American women underwent examination with a 12-h urine collection. Analyses tested associations of SES, acculturation (language and nativity), and their interaction with norepinephrine (NOREPI) and epinephrine (EPI).

Results

No main effects for SES or the acculturation indicators emerged. Fully adjusted models revealed a significant SES by language interaction for NOREPI (p < .01) and EPI (p < .05), and a SES by nativity interaction approached significance for NOREPI (p = .05). Simple slope analyses revealed that higher SES related to lower catecholamine levels in Spanish-speaking women, and higher NOREPI in English-speaking women. Although nonsignificant, similar patterns were observed for nativity.

Conclusions

Associations between SES and catecholamines may vary by acculturation, and cultural factors should be considered when examining SES health effects in Hispanics.

Keywords

Socioeconomic stress Hispanic Stress Acculturation 

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica A. Jiménez
    • 1
    • 4
  • Smriti Shivpuri
    • 2
  • Karla Espinosa de los Monteros
    • 2
  • Karen A. Matthews
    • 3
  • Paul J. Mills
    • 4
  • Linda C. Gallo
    • 2
  1. 1.San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Public HealthSan Diego State University/University of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologySan Diego State University/University of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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