Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 32–47

Exercise Interventions for Cancer Survivors: A Meta-Analysis of Quality of Life Outcomes

  • Rebecca A. Ferrer
  • Tania B. Huedo-Medina
  • Blair T. Johnson
  • Stacey Ryan
  • Linda S. Pescatello
Original Article

Abstract

Background

Exercise improves quality of life (QOL) in cancer survivors, although characteristics of efficacious exercise interventions for this population have not been identified.

Purpose

The present meta-analysis examines the efficacy of exercise interventions in improving QOL in cancer survivors, as well as features that may moderate such effects.

Method

Studies were identified and coded, and QOL effect sizes were calculated and analyzed for trends.

Results

Overall, exercise interventions increased QOL, but this tendency depended to some extent on exercise and patient features. Although several features were associated with effect sizes, models revealed that interventions were particularly successful if they targeted more intense aerobic exercise and addressed women. These tendencies emerged over longer periods of time and were more prominent in studies with higher methodological quality.

Conclusion

Appropriately designed exercise interventions enhance QOL for cancer survivors and this pattern is especially evident for women. Limitations are discussed.

Keywords

Cancer Oncology Exercise Behavioral interventions Quality of life Meta-analysis Exercise interventions Cancer survivors 

Supplementary material

12160_2010_9225_MOESM1_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Table A1Bivariate moderators of QOL effect sizes at first available follow-up assessment (DOCX 16 kb)
12160_2010_9225_MOESM2_ESM.docx (17 kb)
Table A2Bivariate moderators of QOL effect sizes at first available follow-up as gauged by change from baseline in intervention groups, clustered by methodological quality (DOCX 16 kb)

Copyright information

© US Government 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca A. Ferrer
    • 1
  • Tania B. Huedo-Medina
    • 2
  • Blair T. Johnson
    • 2
  • Stacey Ryan
    • 3
  • Linda S. Pescatello
    • 3
  1. 1.Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology and Center for Health, Intervention, and PreventionUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  3. 3.Department of Kinesiology and Center for Health, Intervention, and PreventionUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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