Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 209–216 | Cite as

What is Needed to Reverse the Trends in Childhood Obesity? A Call to Action

  • Paul A. Estabrooks
  • Edwin B. Fisher
  • Laura L. Hayman
Original Article

Abstract

Background

To address the complexity of issues surrounding childhood obesity, the Society of Behavioral Medicine identified childhood obesity as a special focus of its 2007 Annual Meeting.

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to provide a brief summary of the content of these sessions, promising practices that were presented, and recommendations for behavioral medicine research and practice professionals to facilitate reversing the current trends in childhood obesity.

Methods and Results

A social-ecological perspective was used to discuss views on biological and genetic perspectives, the need for policy and environmental approaches, and the need to expand the types of research and practice being conducted.

Conclusions

Recommendations included the need to (1) conduct a broader examination of potential policy, program, and practice strategies across social ecological levels, (2) use team approaches to science that include multiple disciplines and perspectives, (3) expand the methods and metrics used to demonstrate the value of childhood obesity treatment or prevention interventions, (4) use integrated research and practice partnerships, and (5) explicitly assess the potential of intervention strategies to reduce health disparities.

Keywords

Childhood obesity Social-ecological perspective Treatment or prevention interventions 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This paper provides an overview of sessions related to childhood obesity at the 2007 Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting. Financial support was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (grant #59156-PI Estabrooks).

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Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul A. Estabrooks
    • 1
    • 4
  • Edwin B. Fisher
    • 2
  • Laura L. Hayman
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, & Exercise; Center for Translational Obesity ResearchVirginia Polytechnic Institute & State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Behavior & Health EducationUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public HealthChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.College of Nursing and Health SciencesUniversity of Massachusetts-BostonBostonUSA
  4. 4.VT Riverside, 1 Riverside Circle SWRoanokeUSA

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