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Gender Issues

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 35–55 | Cite as

Women, islam, and the state in Pakistan

  • Afshan Jafar
Articles

Abstract

In this paper, I outline the history of Pakistan’s experience with “Islamic” laws and their impact on women. I also trace the links between the state, nationalism, religion, and women’s organizations, and demonstrate how they have shaped women's lives in Pakistan. I focus mainly on General Zia ul-Haq’s influence in fostering and reinforcing certain detrimental ideologies and policies regarding women. I argue that a close examination of the state, nationalism, the search for cultural authenticity in post-colonial nations, and the struggles and dilemmas of women's activism in Muslim cultures are all central to advancing the discussion of women in islam.

Keywords

Gender Issue Muslim Woman Gender Ideology Rape Victim Muslim Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Afshan Jafar
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MassachusettsAmherst

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