Earth Science Informatics

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 1–5 | Cite as

Data sharing and retrieval using OAI-PMH

  • Ranjeet Devarakonda
  • Giri Palanisamy
  • James M. Green
  • Bruce E. Wilson
Research Article

Abstract

There is a growing consensus for the need to store and archive digital data, particularly for publicly funded research. Long-term preservation of that data generally requires some form of institutional archive, such as those directed to particular scientific communities of practice. Given that data is often of use to multiple communities of practice, which may have differing norms for data and metadata structure and semantics, effective standards for data and metadata exchange are important factors for users to be able to find and retrieve data. Toolsets that provide a coherent presentation of information across multiple standards are important for data search and access. One such toolset, Mercury, is a open-source metadata harvesting, data discovery, and access system, built for researchers to search for, share and obtain spatiotemporal data used across a range of climate and ecological sciences. Mercury is used across multiple projects to provide a coherent search interface for spatiotemporal data described in any of several metadata formats. Mercury has recently been extended to enable harvesting and distribution of metadata using the Open Archive Initiative Protocol for Metadata Handling (OAI-PMH). In this paper we describe Mercury’s capabilities with multiple metadata formats, in general, and, more specifically, the results of our OAI-PMH implementations and the lessons learned.

Keywords

Mercury search system Scientific data search OAI-PMH jOAI Data sharing Metadata Ecological informatics Climate change Environmental informatics Spatiotemporal data 

References

  1. Devarakonda R, Palanisamy G, Green J, Wilson BE (2008) Mercury: An Example of Effective Software Reuse for Metadata Management, Data Discovery and Access, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., IN11A-1019Google Scholar
  2. Devarakonda R, Palanisamy G, Wilson BE, Green JM (2010) Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system. Earth Science Informatic 3(1):87–94. doi:10.1007/s12145-010-0050-7 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lynch CA (1997) The Z39.50 Information Retrieval Standard. Part I: A Strategic View of Its Past, Present and Future. D-Lib Magazine, AprilGoogle Scholar
  4. NAS (2010) Ensuring the Integrity, Accessibility, and Stewardship of Research Data in the Digital Age (ISBN 0-309-13685-7). The National Academies Press.Google Scholar
  5. NSTC (2009) “Harnessing the Power of Digital Data for Science and Society” Report of the Interagency Working Group on Digital Data to the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council. Washington, D.C. Available at: http://www.nitrd.gov/About/Harnessing_Power_Web.pdf
  6. OAI (2010) Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting. Interoperability through Metadata Exchange. Retrieved May 2010, Avialable at: http://www.openarchives.org/pmh/
  7. Suleman H, Fox EAA (2001) Framework for building open digital libraries D-Lib Magazine 7#12.Google Scholar
  8. UCAR (2010) jOAI software, developed by Digital Learning Sciences (DLS) (http://www.dlsciences.org/) at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (http://www.ucar.edu/). Retrieved May 2010, Avialable at: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/joai_software.jsp
  9. Van de Sompel H et al (2004) “Resource Harvesting within the OAI-PMH Framework,” D-Lib Magazine 10#2Google Scholar

Copyright information

© US Government 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ranjeet Devarakonda
    • 1
  • Giri Palanisamy
    • 1
  • James M. Green
    • 2
  • Bruce E. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Oak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.Information International AssociatesOak RidgeUSA

Personalised recommendations