Current Psychology

, 27:145 | Cite as

Fear Appeals Revisited: Testing a Unique Anti-smoking Film

Article

Abstract

Past research has found that fear-arousing persuasive messages can significantly affect attitudes, intentions, and behaviors. In this study, participants in high and low threat conditions viewed appropriately edited versions of a unique fear appeal video used in the American Lung Association’s anti-smoking campaign, while control condition participants viewed no film. Threat condition participants expressed stronger anti-smoking behavioral intentions than did control condition participants. These results represent the first effectiveness test of this widely used film.

Keywords

Adolescents Fear appeals Persuasive communication Smoking Tobacco Prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.RTI InternationalWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyBaltimoreUSA

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