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Current Psychology

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 187–195 | Cite as

From attitudes to behaviour: Basic and applied research on the theory of planned behaviour

  • Christopher J. Armitage
  • Julie Christian
Article

Abstract

The present article traces the development of the theory of planned behaviour, from early research on the attitude-behaviour relationship through the theory of reasoned action. In particular, it is argued that a perceived lack of correspondence between attitude and behaviour led to examination of variables that either moderated (e.g., attitude strength, measurement correspondence) or mediated (behavioural intention) the relationship between attitudes and behaviour. Several meta-analytic reviews provide strong empirical support for the theory of planned behaviour, yet several applied and basic issues need to be resolved. The six papers that make up the remainder of this special issue address several of these issues.

Keywords

Behavioural Intention Behavioural Control Plan Behaviour Current Psychology Control Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Armitage
    • 1
  • Julie Christian
    • 2
  1. 1.University of SheffieldUK
  2. 2.University of BirminghamUK

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