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Current Psychology

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 138–146 | Cite as

Perceptions of group homogeneity as a function of social comparison: The mediating role of group identity

  • David De Cremer
Article

Abstract

Recent research has shown that creating an intergroup context of comparison may influence the outgroup homogeneity effect or even turn it into an ingroup homogeneity effect. In the present study, the aim was to replicate these findings by using overall judgment of similarity instead of the more commonly used dimensional ratings. Further, and more importantly, it was argued that this effect could be explained by an increase in the salience of participants’ group identity. The results showed that context of comparison revealed an effect on both level of group identification and perceptions of relative ingroup and outgroup homogeneity. In line with predictions, participants’ level of group identification seemed to account for the effect of the comparison context on the homogeneity ratings.

Keywords

Social Comparison Group Identification Current Psychology Intergroup Relation Social Psychology Bulletin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universiteit MaastrichtThe Netherlands

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