Current Psychology

, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp 143–146 | Cite as

Individual differences in problem solving via insight

Article

Abstract

The purpose of the present work was to identify general problem solving skills that underlie the production of insight. One hundred and eighteen participants completed insight problems, analogies, series-completion problems and the Remote Associates Test. Scores on all measures were related to performance on the insight problems (Pearson r's ranged from .31 to .47, p < .008). These findings are consistent with the notion that the abilities to apprehend relations and fluency of thought are involved in insightful problem solving.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Metropolitan State College of DenverDepartment of PsychologyDenver

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