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Human Rights Review

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 107–129 | Cite as

Externalizing Human Rights: From Commission to Council, the Universal Periodic Review and Egypt

  • Laura K. LandoltEmail author
Article

Abstract

Critics of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (CHR) and its successor, the Human Rights Council (HRC), focus on member state efforts to protect themselves and allies from external pressure for human rights implementation. Even though HRC members still shield rights abusers, the new Universal Periodic Review (UPR) subjects all states to regular scrutiny, and provides substantial new space for domestic NGOs to externalize domestic human rights demands. This paper offers an institutional account of the expansion of NGO externalization opportunities from the CHR to the HRC, and during UPR institution building and Egypt’s 2010 UPR. It draws on 45 longitudinal, open-ended interviews with Egyptian human rights activists, donors, and other observers conducted in 2007 and 2010.

Keywords

Human rights Externalization Universal Periodic Review (UPR) Human Rights Council Egypt 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceOakland UniversityRochesterUSA

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