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International Journal of the Classical Tradition

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 279–327 | Cite as

Book reviews

  • Stephanie Nelson
  • L. J. Samons
  • Thomas Figueira
  • Erich S. Gruen
  • Georg Luck
  • Gareth Schmeling
  • David Roochnik
  • Simon Goldhill
  • Jonathan Barnes
  • James R. Russell
  • Gail Holst-Warhaft
  • Robert W. Gaston
  • Robin Sowerby
  • Bruce Redford
  • Kenneth MacKinnon
Article
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References

  1. 1.
    Quoted according to Joseph Addison, “An Essay on the Georgics,” in: John Dryden, The Works of John Dryden, vol. 5. Poems. The Works of Virgil in English. 1697, ed. W. Frost and V. A. Dearing, (Berkeley, Los Angeles, & London: University of California Press, 1987), p. 149.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    [Cf. the review article “A Disapproving Voice” by Sir Hugh Lloyd-Jones in this journal, IJCT 5 (1998/99), 456–466.—W.H.]Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    J. Winkler, “Introduction to Achilles Tatius’ ‘Leucippe and Clitophon,’” Collected Ancient Greek Novels, ed. Bryan Reardon, Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1989.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    See most recently Maaike Zimmermann’s preface (especially xii–xiv) to the anthology of essays The Ancient Novel and Beyond, eds. Stelios Panayotakis, Maaike Zimmermann, and Wyste Keulen, Mnemosyne Supplementum 241, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jeffrey Henderson, The Maculate Muse: Obscence Language in Attic Comedy Second edition, New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991: 113.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    James N. O’Sullivan, A Lexicon to Achilles Tatius, Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte 18 Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1980: 201–202.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Though he does not use the word καινóζ, -ή, -óν, the paradoxoghrapher Phlegon of Tralles, a near-contemporary of Achilles Tatius, continually reminds the reader of the odd and wondrous narure of his subject matter: διά τò θαυμαστòν \(\tau \overset{\lower0.5em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\frown}$}}{\eta } \varsigma \) φαντασίαζ (FGrH 257. 36.1.1), παράδoξoν λóγoν (FGrH 257. 36.1.2), άρίστoν θεάματoζ (FGrH 257.36.1.8), τήν φύσιν θαν-\(\mu \alpha \sigma \tau \overset{\lower0.5em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\frown}$}}{\omega } \varsigma \) δινλλαγμένoν (FGrH 257.36.2.1), έπὶ παραδóξ\(\mathop \omega \limits_\iota \) γεγOηóτι (257.36.2.4), έτιφανέστατα \(\sigma \eta \mu \varepsilon \overset{\lower0.5em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\frown}$}}{\iota } \alpha \) (FGrH 257. 36.3.2).Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    The generous bibliography on Ammonius might be supplemented by e.g. A.C. Lloyd’s chapter “Athenian and Alexandrian Neoplatonism,” in A.H. Armstrong, The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Mediaeval Philosophy (Cambridge, 1970), pp. 302–305, and H.-D. Saffrey and J.-P. Mahé, in R. Goulet, Dictionnaire des philosophes antiques I (Paris, 1989), pp. 168–170. The exiguous bibliography on the Latin tradition could easily and usefully have been expanded.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. Busse (ed.), Ammonius—in Porphyrii Isagogen sive v voces, Commentaria in Aristotelem Graeca IV iii (Berlin, 1891).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pomponii Gaurici Neapolitani in quinque voces Porphyrii commentariolus ex Ammonio.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    ‘oνσια quam in latino Plautus entiam nominavit’: ‘Plautus’ is L. Sergius Plautus, a Stoic of the first century A.D., and Gauricus knew him from Quintilian—from II xiv 2, which refers to ‘illa Plauti essentia et queentia’, and where there is a reading ‘atque entia’? From III vi 23, which refers to ‘oύσίαν quam Plautus essentiam vocat’, and where Gauricus perhaps read or substituted ‘entiam’ for ‘essentiam’?Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    How and by what stages did the mutation come about? As well as the 1504 edition, Lohr mentions a Paris edition of 1511 and a further Venetian edition of 1526 (p. XVIII)—about which I know nothing.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    See J.R. Russell, “Scythians and Avesta in an Armenian Vernacular Paternoster, and a Zok Paternoster,” Le Muséon 110.1–2, 1997, pp. 98–99, n. 13. I pointed all this out at a conference at St. Vartan Armenian Cathedral in New York to Prof. Stone in the discussion following his presentation of a paper on which this book is based; and printed it soon thereafter. He might have taken the slight effort to cite it, for the mythological sources of traditions that he himself stresses belong to the realm of folk religion are supremely relevant to the discussion. One’s numerous studies on the Armenian aquatic monster, the višap, who figures prominently in the Adam myths, should have been cited, as well as one’s first translation into English, with commentary, of Tclkurancci on these matters. But then it is an aspect of our fallen state that the first thing we do upon opening a new book is to look for ourselves in the Bibliography, like Narcissus, in his pool or better a Mesopotamian demon reading about himself in a magic bowl just as it is turned over on him and he is trapped!Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Alexiou’s grandmother, Jessie Stewart, was one of Jane Harrison’s first students and her biographer; cf M. Beard, The Invention of Jane Harrison, Revealing Antiquity 14 (Cambridge, MA & London: Harvard University Press, 2000), 131f., 142–151.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    M.M. Bakhtin, Speech genres and other late essays, ed. C. Emerson and M. Holquist, trans. V.W. McGee (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1986) (Russian orig. Éstetika slovesnogo tvorchestva [Moscow: Iskusstvo, 1979]).Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Durrell, Prospero’s Cell (London: Faber and Faber, 1945, 1962). All quotations will be from the 1962 edition and will appear parenthetically in the text.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Transaction Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie Nelson
    • 1
  • L. J. Samons
    • 1
  • Thomas Figueira
    • 2
  • Erich S. Gruen
    • 3
  • Georg Luck
    • 4
  • Gareth Schmeling
    • 5
  • David Roochnik
    • 6
  • Simon Goldhill
    • 7
  • Jonathan Barnes
    • 8
  • James R. Russell
    • 9
  • Gail Holst-Warhaft
    • 10
  • Robert W. Gaston
    • 11
  • Robin Sowerby
    • 12
  • Bruce Redford
    • 1
  • Kenneth MacKinnon
    • 13
  1. 1.Department of Classical StudiesBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Classics RutgersThe State University of New JerseyUSA
  3. 3.Department of HistoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeley
  4. 4.Department of ClassicsJohns Hopkins UniversityUSA
  5. 5.Department of ClassicsUniversity of FloridaUSA
  6. 6.Department of PhilosophyBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  7. 7.King’s CollegeCambridge
  8. 8.Paris
  9. 9.Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations-Armenian StudiesHarvard UniversityHarvardUSA
  10. 10.Institute for European Studies-ClassicsCornell UniversityUSA
  11. 11.Department of Art HistoryLa Trobe UniversityAustralia
  12. 12.Department of English StudiesUniversity of StirlingUK
  13. 13.School of Literary and Media StudiesLondon Metropolitan UniversityLondonUK

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