Urban Forum

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 59–75

Overcoming the Challenge of Vertical Consolidation in South Africa's Low-Income Settlements: a Case Study of Du Noon

Article

Abstract

Theoretically, the evident demand for housing in growing cities, particularly in the Global South would result in vertical consolidation of properties. However, unlike places in Latin America, where market and state responses to urbanisation are pushing cities higher and higher, in South Africa, the densification and land use intensity has, generally, remained horizontal, rather than vertical in nature. Du Noon offers an interesting counter position to this narrative. Unlike other Reconstruction and Development Housing Programme settlements, many property owners are demolishing the state-delivered units and erecting double-storey rental accommodation. Drawing from interviews conducted with 21 of these structure owners, this paper explores the drivers of this ‘vertical consolidation’ in Du Noon drawing lessons for housing policy and practice in South Africa.

Keywords

Housing South Africa Incremental Land markets Du Noon Density 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert McGaffin
    • 1
  • Liza Rose Cirolia
    • 2
  • Mark Massyn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Construction Economics and ManagementUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa
  2. 2.African Centre for CitiesUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa

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