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Urban Forum

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 309–324 | Cite as

Why Won’t Downtown Johannesburg ‘Regenerate’? Reassessing Hillbrow as a Case Example

  • Tanja WinklerEmail author
Article

Abstract

This paper argues that neighbourhood change in Hillbrow is not concomitant with the linear processes of urban decline and economic resurgence. Instead, neighbourhood change is shaped by situated histories, politics and economics, in addition to the activities of diverse local actors. It also argues that despite severe physical decay, a history of being redlined and limited public sector support for the provision of public services, Hillbrow remains a resilient port-of-entry neighbourhood to Johannesburg for many residents who desire to engage in local and transnational economies. Current debates on urban land markets, therefore, necessitate an awareness of the roles that port-of-entry neighbourhoods facilitate in (mega)cities, and alternative urban planning responses to conventional regeneration strategies that are based on liberal market rationalities alone.

Keywords

Port-of-entry neighbourhoods Urban regeneration Linear market rationalities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Architecture, Planning and GeomaticsUniversity of Cape TownRondeboschSouth Africa

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